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Laboring women : reproduction and gender in New World slavery / Jennifer L. Morgan.

By: Morgan, Jennifer L. (Jennifer Lyle).
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Early American studies: Publisher: Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2004Description: 1 online resource (279 p.) : ill., maps.ISBN: 9780812206371 (electronic bk.); 0812206371 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Women slaves -- North America -- Social conditions | Women slaves -- West Indies, British -- Social conditions | Sex role -- North America -- History | Sex role -- West Indies, British -- History | Human reproduction -- Social aspects -- North America -- History | Human reproduction -- Social aspects -- West Indies, British -- History | Slavery -- North America -- History | Slavery -- West Indies, British -- History | North America -- Race relations | West Indies, British -- Race relationsAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 306.3/62/082097 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
"Some could suckle over their shoulder": male travelers, female bodies, and the gendering of racial ideology -- "The number of women doeth much disparayes the whole cargoe": the trans-Atlantic slave trade and west African gender roles -- "The breedings shall goe with their mothers": gender and evolving practices of slaveownership in the English American colonies -- "Hannah and hir children": reproduction and creolization among enslaved women -- "Women's sweat": gender and agricultural labor in the Atlantic world -- "Deluders and seducers of each other": gender and the changing nature of resistance.
Action note: digitized 2011 committed to preserve
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HT1048 .M67 2004 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt3fhf79 Available ocn802298888

Includes bibliographical references (p. [251]-271) and index.

"Some could suckle over their shoulder": male travelers, female bodies, and the gendering of racial ideology -- "The number of women doeth much disparayes the whole cargoe": the trans-Atlantic slave trade and west African gender roles -- "The breedings shall goe with their mothers": gender and evolving practices of slaveownership in the English American colonies -- "Hannah and hir children": reproduction and creolization among enslaved women -- "Women's sweat": gender and agricultural labor in the Atlantic world -- "Deluders and seducers of each other": gender and the changing nature of resistance.

Description based on print version record.

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Electronic reproduction. [S.l.] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2011. MiAaHDL

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212

digitized 2011 HathiTrust Digital Library committed to preserve pda MiAaHDL

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Morgan (history and women's and gender studies, Rutgers Univ.) argues that African women who lived out their lives as slaves in the English colonies shared similar circumstances that transcended differences in the geographic location or size of the household in which they labored. The childbearing capacity of enslaved women and the tendency of masters to meddle in slave women's reproductive lives allowed these women to forge common experiences distinct from those of enslaved men. In an effective and captivating manner, Morgan shows the heartbreaking dislocation African women underwent when forced to confront the violence and degradation of New World slavery. However, she also emphasizes the cultural continuity African women attempted to preserve when taken from their homelands to the Americas. Morgan's remarkably lucid treatment of the role of gender in constructing racial ideologies and in justifying the economic system of slavery should make such complex themes accessible to advanced undergraduates. Her book succeeds in highlighting the importance of African women in determining the shape of the slave system in the New World, as well as the ways in which the system shaped the experiences of African women. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. General collections and upper-division undergraduates and above. S. N. Roth Widener University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jennifer L. Morgan teaches history and women's and gender studies at Rutgers University, New Brunswick.

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