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Luise Gottsched the Translator.

By: Brown, Hilary.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Studies in German Literature Linguistics and Culture, 118: Publisher: Woodbridge : Boydell & Brewer Ltd., 2012Description: 1 online resource (258 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781571138217; 1571138218.Subject(s): Translators -- Germany | English language -- Translating into German | Enlightenment -- GermanyAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Luise Gottsched the Translator.DDC classification: 418.02092 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Frontcover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1: Gottsched as Female Translator; 2: Philosophy and Religion; 3: Journalism; 4: Drama; 5: Poetry and Literary Prose; 6: Science and Scholarship; 7: Translation and "Original" Writing; Conclusion; Appendix: Luise Gottsched's Translations and Adaptations; Works Cited; Index; Backcover.
Summary: Critics have paid increasing attention to the oeuvre of Luise Gottsched (1713-62), Germany's first prominent woman of letters, but have neglected her lifelong work of translation: an extraordinary range of works from drama and poetry to philosophy, history, archaeology, even theoretical physics. This first overview of Gottsched's translations places them in the context of eighteenth-century intellectual, literary, and cultural history, showing that they were part of an ambitious program undertaken with her famous husband to shape German culture during the Enlightenment.
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Frontcover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1: Gottsched as Female Translator; 2: Philosophy and Religion; 3: Journalism; 4: Drama; 5: Poetry and Literary Prose; 6: Science and Scholarship; 7: Translation and "Original" Writing; Conclusion; Appendix: Luise Gottsched's Translations and Adaptations; Works Cited; Index; Backcover.

Critics have paid increasing attention to the oeuvre of Luise Gottsched (1713-62), Germany's first prominent woman of letters, but have neglected her lifelong work of translation: an extraordinary range of works from drama and poetry to philosophy, history, archaeology, even theoretical physics. This first overview of Gottsched's translations places them in the context of eighteenth-century intellectual, literary, and cultural history, showing that they were part of an ambitious program undertaken with her famous husband to shape German culture during the Enlightenment.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this attractive book, Brown (Univ. of Birmingham, UK) illuminates Luise Gottsched's unrecognized contributions to the Enlightenment. She explains that the concept of translation is undergoing redefinition and was poorly understood in the past. Eighteenth-century translation did not lack creativity, and it was not literal. Borrowing from others and altering texts to add meaning was not considered inappropriate. Translation was recommended as a way of improving one's own style, so it played an important role in the oeuvre of numerous thinkers. Gottsched (1716-62) was well read in several languages, well connected in university circles, and passionate about transmitting ideas of European rationalism. She not only translated French drama for her poet/author husband, Johann Christoph Gottsched, but also translated materials in philosophy, religion, journalism, science, and classical studies in at least four languages,. She translated whole runs of English moral weeklies and cooperated with the translation of French dictionaries. Brown shows that this work did not keep Gottsched from original composition, which was integral to her development. Brown provides new perspectives and suggests further study of translation and of an Enlightenment woman's unexamined depth of achievements. The book includes fine illustrations and notes. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through researchers/faculty. E. Wickersham emerita, Rosemont College

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