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The curse of Ham : race and slavery in early Judaism, Christianity, and Islam / David M. Goldenberg.

By: Goldenberg, David M, 1947-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Jews, Christians, and Muslims from the ancient to the modern world: Publisher: Princeton, N.J. ; Woodstock : Princeton University Press, ©2003Description: 1 online resource (xx, 448 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400828548 (electronic bk.); 1400828546 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Ham (Biblical figure) | Bible. Genesis IX, 18-25 -- Criticism, interpretation, etc | Blacks in the Bible | Blacks -- Public opinion -- History -- To 1500 | Jews -- Attitudes -- History -- To 1500 | Christians -- Attitudes -- History -- To 1500 | Muslims -- Attitudes -- History -- To 1500 | Slavery -- Justification -- History | Black race -- ColorAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Curse of Ham.DDC classification: 200.8996 LOC classification: BS580.H27 | G65 2003Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
I: Images of blacks -- 1. Biblical Israel: the land of Kush -- 2. Biblical Israel: the people of Kush -- 3. Postbiblical Israel: black Africa -- 4. Postbiblical Israel: black Africans -- II: The color of skin -- 5. The color of women -- 6. The color of health -- 7. The colors of mankind -- 8. The colored meaning of Kushite in postbiblical literature -- III: History -- 9. Evidence for black slaves in Israel -- IV: At the crossroads of history and exegesis -- 10. Was Ham back? -- 11. "Ham sinned and Canaan was cursed?" -- 12. The curse of Ham -- 13. The curse of Cain -- 14. The new world of order: humanity by physiognomy -- Jewish views of black Africans and the development of anti-black sentiment in western thought -- When is a Kushite not a Kushite? Cases of mistake identity -- Kush/Ethiopia and India.
Summary: How old is prejudice against black people? Were the racist attitudes that fueled the Atlantic slave trade firmly in place 700 years before the European discovery of sub-Saharan Africa? In this groundbreaking book, David Goldenberg seeks to discover how dark-skinned peoples, especially black Africans, were portrayed in the Bible and by those who interpreted the Bible--Jews, Christians, and Muslims. Unprecedented in rigor and breadth, his investigation covers a 1,500-year period, from ancient Israel (around 800 B.C.E.) to the eighth century C.E., after the birth of Islam.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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BS580.H27 G65 2003 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt7rm4x Available ocn501292312

Includes bibliographical references (pages 213-378) and index.

I: Images of blacks -- 1. Biblical Israel: the land of Kush -- 2. Biblical Israel: the people of Kush -- 3. Postbiblical Israel: black Africa -- 4. Postbiblical Israel: black Africans -- II: The color of skin -- 5. The color of women -- 6. The color of health -- 7. The colors of mankind -- 8. The colored meaning of Kushite in postbiblical literature -- III: History -- 9. Evidence for black slaves in Israel -- IV: At the crossroads of history and exegesis -- 10. Was Ham back? -- 11. "Ham sinned and Canaan was cursed?" -- 12. The curse of Ham -- 13. The curse of Cain -- 14. The new world of order: humanity by physiognomy -- Jewish views of black Africans and the development of anti-black sentiment in western thought -- When is a Kushite not a Kushite? Cases of mistake identity -- Kush/Ethiopia and India.

How old is prejudice against black people? Were the racist attitudes that fueled the Atlantic slave trade firmly in place 700 years before the European discovery of sub-Saharan Africa? In this groundbreaking book, David Goldenberg seeks to discover how dark-skinned peoples, especially black Africans, were portrayed in the Bible and by those who interpreted the Bible--Jews, Christians, and Muslims. Unprecedented in rigor and breadth, his investigation covers a 1,500-year period, from ancient Israel (around 800 B.C.E.) to the eighth century C.E., after the birth of Islam.

Description based on print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Goldenberg (Penn) has produced an outstanding and comprehensive study of "the curse of Ham," which has been used to justify the enslavement of Africans for centuries. With impressive scholarly detail, he argues that "no negative evaluations of real Blacks (as opposed to imaginary literary constructs) were found either in biblical or postbiblical sources. Race did not matter." He follows the models of Frank Snowden's Blacks in Antiquity (CH, Jun'70) and Lloyd Thompson's Romans and Blacks (CH, Oct'89), which similarly argued that the world of classical antiquity was not racist toward black Africans. Early Judaism, Christianity, and Islam did not have racist views of Africans or Kushites. Goldenberg traces the link between racism and the enslavement of Africans with the expansion of the Islamic empire in the mid-seventh century. In this comprehensive survey, Goldenberg has missed Joseph Washington's Anti-Blackness in English Religion, 1500-1800 (CH, Sep'85), which argued that the racial linkage of the curse of Ham was found in Talmudic, Halakic, and Midrashic literature. Extensive footnotes and index of ancient sources. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students and specialists in the field. L. H. Mamiya Vassar College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

David M. Goldenberg is Isidore and Theresa Cohen Chair of Jewish Religion and Thought at the University of Cape Town, and Visiting Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania. He was formerly President of Dropsie College for Hebrew and Cognate Learning, Associate Director of the Annenberg Research Institute for Judaic and Near Eastern Studies, and Editor of The Jewish Quarterly Review .

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