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Race for empire : Koreans as Japanese and Japanese as Americans during World War II / T. Fujitani.

By: Fujitani, Takashi [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Asia Pacific modern: 7.Publisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, [2011]Copyright date: ©2011Description: 1 online resource (xxi, 488 pages) : illustrations, maps.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780520950368 (electronic bk.); 0520950364 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): World War, 1939-1945 -- Participation, Japanese American | World War, 1939-1945 -- Participation, Korean | World War, 1939-1945 -- Social aspects -- United States | World War, 1939-1945 -- Social aspects -- Japan | Nationalism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Nationalism -- Japan -- History -- 20th century | Racism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Racism -- Japan -- History -- 20th century | Imperialism -- History -- 20th centuryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Race for empire.DDC classification: 305.800973 | 940.53089956073 Other classification: HIS003000 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
pt. 1. From vulgar to polite racism. 1. Right to Kill, Right to Make Live: Koreans as Japanese -- 2. "Very Useful and Very Dangerous": The Global Politics of Life, Death, and Race -- pt. 2. Japanese as Americans. 3. Subject to Choice, Labyrinth of (Un)freedom -- 4. Reasoning, Counterreasonings, and Counter-conduct -- 5. Go for Broke, the Movie: The Transwar Making of American Heroes -- pt. 3. Koreans as Japanese. 6. National Mobilization -- 7. Nation, Blood, and Self-Determination -- 8. The Colonial and National Politics of Gender, Sex, and Family.
Summary: "Race for Empire offers a profound and challenging reinterpretation of nationalism, racism, and wartime mobilization during the Asia-Pacific war. In parallel case studies--of Japanese Americans mobilized to serve in the United States Army and of Koreans recruited or drafted into the Japanese military--T. Fujitani examines the U.S. and Japanese empires as they struggled to manage racialized populations while waging total war. Fujitani probes governmental policies and analyzes representations of these soldiers--on film, in literature, and in archival documents--to reveal how characteristics of racism, nationalism, capitalism, gender politics, and the family changed on both sides. He demonstrates that the United States and Japan became increasingly alike over the course of the war, perhaps most tellingly in their common attempts to disavow racism even as they reproduced it in new ways and forms"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
D769.8.A6 F798 2011 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt1pnjtg Available ocn759101284

"A Philip E. Lilienthal book."

Includes bibliographical references (p. 447-468) and index.

pt. 1. From vulgar to polite racism. 1. Right to Kill, Right to Make Live: Koreans as Japanese -- 2. "Very Useful and Very Dangerous": The Global Politics of Life, Death, and Race -- pt. 2. Japanese as Americans. 3. Subject to Choice, Labyrinth of (Un)freedom -- 4. Reasoning, Counterreasonings, and Counter-conduct -- 5. Go for Broke, the Movie: The Transwar Making of American Heroes -- pt. 3. Koreans as Japanese. 6. National Mobilization -- 7. Nation, Blood, and Self-Determination -- 8. The Colonial and National Politics of Gender, Sex, and Family.

"Race for Empire offers a profound and challenging reinterpretation of nationalism, racism, and wartime mobilization during the Asia-Pacific war. In parallel case studies--of Japanese Americans mobilized to serve in the United States Army and of Koreans recruited or drafted into the Japanese military--T. Fujitani examines the U.S. and Japanese empires as they struggled to manage racialized populations while waging total war. Fujitani probes governmental policies and analyzes representations of these soldiers--on film, in literature, and in archival documents--to reveal how characteristics of racism, nationalism, capitalism, gender politics, and the family changed on both sides. He demonstrates that the United States and Japan became increasingly alike over the course of the war, perhaps most tellingly in their common attempts to disavow racism even as they reproduced it in new ways and forms"-- Provided by publisher.

Description based on print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In examining the experience of Japanese Americans in the US and Korean colonials within the Japanese empire during WW II, Fujitani (Univ. of Toronto) seeks to remove the "blinders of exceptionalism" that he believes have clouded an accurate understanding of the Pacific War. He concludes that, instead of it being a clear struggle between good and evil, the US and Japan followed remarkably similar policies and techniques in dealing with their own marginalized populations. During the war, both nations transitioned from a blatant, exclusionary, or "vulgar" racism to a humane, inclusive, or "polite" form of racism. The objective of both was to mobilize their ethnic minorities to win the war and to establish regional hegemony afterward. Once in the military, Japanese Americans and Koreans could earn inclusion into their respective national societies. Fujitani relies heavily on the ideas and terminology of Michel Foucault and Franz Fanon for the framework of his study, and his emphasis on racism follows a path pioneered by John Dower in War without Mercy (CH, Nov'86). Although this book is not easy reading, it is very important and should be read and studied by all serious students of Asian studies, Japanese American studies, and the Pacific War. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. C. J. Weeks emeritus, Southern Polytechnic State University

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