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Collecting Mexico : museums, monuments, and the creation of national identity / Shelley E. Garrigan.

By: Garrigan, Shelley E [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, ©2012Description: 1 online resource (233 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780816680153; 0816680159.Subject(s): Cultural property -- Social aspects -- Mexico | Museums -- Social aspects -- Mexico | National characteristics, MexicanAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Collecting Mexico.DDC classification: 972 LOC classification: F1210 | .G47 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Fine art and demand : debating the Mexican national canon (1876-1910) -- Our archaeology : science, citizenry, patrimony, and the museum -- The hidden lives of historical monuments : commerce, fashion, and memorial -- Collections at the World's Fair : rereading Mexico in Paris, 1889 -- Collecting numbers : statistics and the constructive force of deficiency.
Summary: Collecting Mexico centers on the ways in which aesthetics and commercialism intersected in officially sanctioned public collections and displays in late nineteenth-century Mexico. Shelley E. Garrigan reconstructs the lineage of institutionally collected objects around which a modern Mexican identity was negotiated, demonstrating the ways in which displayed objects become linked with nationalistic meaning and why they exert such persuasive force.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F1210 .G47 2012 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctttswrj Available ocn794492286

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Collecting Mexico centers on the ways in which aesthetics and commercialism intersected in officially sanctioned public collections and displays in late nineteenth-century Mexico. Shelley E. Garrigan reconstructs the lineage of institutionally collected objects around which a modern Mexican identity was negotiated, demonstrating the ways in which displayed objects become linked with nationalistic meaning and why they exert such persuasive force.

Fine art and demand : debating the Mexican national canon (1876-1910) -- Our archaeology : science, citizenry, patrimony, and the museum -- The hidden lives of historical monuments : commerce, fashion, and memorial -- Collections at the World's Fair : rereading Mexico in Paris, 1889 -- Collecting numbers : statistics and the constructive force of deficiency.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Garrigan (Spanish, North Carolina State Univ.) offers an eloquent tour of the reconstructing of Mexican identity from 1867 to 1891, in the aftermath of almost six decades of political and economic turmoil, internal wars, and foreign invasions. She uses extensive archival materials, from newspaper and magazines articles to government and scholarly documents, in her interpretations. Chapter 1 analyzes the divergences of local promotion, recognition, and production of art as an emergent agent of national symbolism. In chapter 2, the author examines archaeology as the new "national science," and the creation of the Museo Nacional as a place to celebrate the collective memory and develop a sense of nationalism among visitors. Garrigan studies dynamic debate among local and foreign influences in chapter 3 in the creation of the commemorative monuments erected in Mexico City designed to reinforce nationalism. Chapter 4 addresses the crossroads of the patrimony and commerce of Mexican participation at the 1889 Paris World's Fair. Finally, Garrigan scrutinizes the science of statistics as the passive tool used by the government ruling elite as the language to control the material order of society. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. R. A. Santillan Medgar Evers College, CUNY

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