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The politics of secularism in international relations / Elizabeth Shakman Hurd.

By: Hurd, Elizabeth Shakman, 1970- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Princeton studies in international history and politics: Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, ©2008Description: 1 online resource (xiii, 247 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400828012; 1400828015; 1282158929; 9781282158924.Subject(s): World politics | Secularism | Religion and politicsAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Politics of secularism in international relations.DDC classification: 327.101 Other classification: 89.70 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction -- Varieties of secularism -- Secularism and Islam -- Contested secularisms in Turkey and Iran -- The European Union and Turkey -- The United States and Iran -- Political Islam -- Religious resurgence -- Conclusion.
Action note: digitized 2010 committed to preserveSummary: Conflicts involving religion have returned to the forefront of international relations. And yet political scientists and policymakers have continued to assume that religion has long been privatized in the West. This secularist assumption ignores the contestation surrounding the category of the "secular" in international politics. The Politics of Secularism in International Relations shows why this thinking is flawed, and provides a powerful alternative.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
D32 .H87 2008 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt7s5nn Available ocn440769678

Includes bibliographical references (pages 213-235) and index.

Introduction -- Varieties of secularism -- Secularism and Islam -- Contested secularisms in Turkey and Iran -- The European Union and Turkey -- The United States and Iran -- Political Islam -- Religious resurgence -- Conclusion.

Conflicts involving religion have returned to the forefront of international relations. And yet political scientists and policymakers have continued to assume that religion has long been privatized in the West. This secularist assumption ignores the contestation surrounding the category of the "secular" in international politics. The Politics of Secularism in International Relations shows why this thinking is flawed, and provides a powerful alternative.

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Electronic reproduction. [S.l.] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2010. MiAaHDL

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212

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Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Hurd (Northwestern Univ.) urges closer looks at both Western secularism and its supposed opposite, political Islam. Both, she argues, are oversimplified and a poor basis for international relations. She distinguishes French-style laicism from US-style Christian secularism, noting that both are relatively recent (post-1648) constructs. Hurd agrees with Samuel Huntington that religion is highly relevant in international relations but implicitly criticizes him for oversimplifying political Islam, which is "diverse, contested, and evolving." The modernization theory that religion will become marginal is poorly grounded and has not been borne out. However, Western writers cannot comprehend international relations based on anything but complete secularism, which itself is neither a norm nor natural. Hurd's two case studies are EU-Turkish and US-Iranian relations. Turkey does not represent a resurgence of Islamic fundamentalism "but a renegotiation of the Kemalist settlement," likely leading to a modern politics. The Iranian revolution was basically anti-shah but taken over by the extremist Khomeini forces. Although it reads like an overfootnoted doctoral dissertation, Hurd's warnings against assuming a permanent pan-Islamic hostility are well taken. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate and research collections. M. G. Roskin Lycoming College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Elizabeth Shakman Hurd is assistant professor of political science at Northwestern University.

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