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Re-imagining the 'dark continent' in fin de siècle literature / Robbie McLaughlan.

By: McLaughlan, Robert [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Edinburgh critical studies in Victorian culture: Publisher: Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, ©2012Description: 1 online resource (viii, 237 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780748647163; 0748647163.Subject(s): Adventure and adventurers in literatureAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Re-imagining the 'dark continent' in fin de siècle literature.DDC classification: 820.996 LOC classification: PR461 | .M339 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Militibus Christi -- Behind the Black Velvet curtain -- Preaching to the nerves.
Summary: "Although nineteenth-century map-makers imposed topographic definition upon a perceived geographical void, writers of Adventure fiction, and other colonial writers, continued to nourish the idea of a cartographic absence in their work. This study explores the effects of this epistemological blankness in fin de siècle literature, and its impact upon early Modernist culture, through the emerging discipline of psychoanalysis and the debt that Freud owed to African exploration. The chapters examine: representations of Black Africa in missionary writing and Rider Haggard's narratives on Africa; cartographic tradition in Conrad's Heart of Darkness and Jung's Memories, Dreams, Reflections; and mesmeric fiction, such as Richard Marsh's The Beetle, Robert Buchanan's The Charlatan and George du Maurier's Trilby. As Robbie McLaughlan demonstrates, it was the late Victorian 'best-seller' which merged an arcane Central African imagery with an interest in psychic phenomena."--Publisher's website.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PR461 .M339 2012 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3366/j.ctt3fgs2z Available ocn826660105

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

Militibus Christi -- Behind the Black Velvet curtain -- Preaching to the nerves.

"Although nineteenth-century map-makers imposed topographic definition upon a perceived geographical void, writers of Adventure fiction, and other colonial writers, continued to nourish the idea of a cartographic absence in their work. This study explores the effects of this epistemological blankness in fin de siècle literature, and its impact upon early Modernist culture, through the emerging discipline of psychoanalysis and the debt that Freud owed to African exploration. The chapters examine: representations of Black Africa in missionary writing and Rider Haggard's narratives on Africa; cartographic tradition in Conrad's Heart of Darkness and Jung's Memories, Dreams, Reflections; and mesmeric fiction, such as Richard Marsh's The Beetle, Robert Buchanan's The Charlatan and George du Maurier's Trilby. As Robbie McLaughlan demonstrates, it was the late Victorian 'best-seller' which merged an arcane Central African imagery with an interest in psychic phenomena."--Publisher's website.

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