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Shakespeare's Brain : Reading with Cognitive Theory.

By: Crane, Mary Thomas.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2001Description: 1 online resource (276 p.).ISBN: 9781400824007 (electronic bk.); 1400824001 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Criticism and interpretation | Consciousness in literature | Cognition in literature | Brain -- Case studiesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 822.33 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Shakespeare's Brain: Embodying the Author-Function; Chapter 1 No Space Like Home: The Comedy of Errors; Chapter 2 Theatrical Practice and the Ideologies of Status in As You Like It; Chapter 3 Twelfth Night: Suitable Suits and the Cognitive Space Between; Chapter 4 Cognitive Hamlet and the Name of Action; Chapter 5 Male Pregnancy and Cognitive Permeability in Measure for Measure; Chapter 6 Sound and Space in The Tempest; Notes; Index.
Summary: Here Mary Thomas Crane considers the brain as a site where body and culture meet to form the subject and its expression in language. Taking Shakespeare as her case study, she boldly demonstrates the explanatory power of cognitive theory--a theory which argues that language is produced by a reciprocal interaction of body and environment, brain and culture, and which refocuses attention on the role of the author in the making of meaning. Crane reveals in Shakespeare's texts a web of structures and categories through which meaning is created. The approach yields fresh insights into a wide range o.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PR2976.C69 2001 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt7sb23 Available ocn609858798

Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Shakespeare's Brain: Embodying the Author-Function; Chapter 1 No Space Like Home: The Comedy of Errors; Chapter 2 Theatrical Practice and the Ideologies of Status in As You Like It; Chapter 3 Twelfth Night: Suitable Suits and the Cognitive Space Between; Chapter 4 Cognitive Hamlet and the Name of Action; Chapter 5 Male Pregnancy and Cognitive Permeability in Measure for Measure; Chapter 6 Sound and Space in The Tempest; Notes; Index.

Here Mary Thomas Crane considers the brain as a site where body and culture meet to form the subject and its expression in language. Taking Shakespeare as her case study, she boldly demonstrates the explanatory power of cognitive theory--a theory which argues that language is produced by a reciprocal interaction of body and environment, brain and culture, and which refocuses attention on the role of the author in the making of meaning. Crane reveals in Shakespeare's texts a web of structures and categories through which meaning is created. The approach yields fresh insights into a wide range o.

Description based on print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Author of Framing Authority: Sayings, Self, and Society in Sixteenth-Century England (1993), Crane (Boston Univ.) maintains that the perspectives of cognitive theory suggest a new consideration of the basic issues in early-modern studies, like the notion of the author, the concept of agency, and ultimately the question of power and containment. In chapters analyzing The Comedy of Errors, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Hamlet, Measure for Measure, and The Tempest, Crane traces chains of images and words that permeate a particular play. Some of these are familiar from new critical readings: e.g., Hamlet's concern with "act," "action," "actor," and "enacture." But using multiple critical approaches and methodology, Crane meticulously demonstrates that in Hamlet Shakespeare uses the cognitive theory available to him, drawn from Timothy Bright's Treatise of Melancholie (1580), to map embodied versions of the human self. The book is flawed occasionally by sloppy editing and an excess of compound structures that obscure an otherwise adventurous argument, but on the whole, graduate students and faculty should find that Crane's intense perusal of Shakespeare partners well with Patricia Parker's Shakespeare from the Margins (CH, Nov'96), Frank Whigham's Seizures of the Will in Early Modern English Drama (CH, Nov'96), and Katherine Eisaman Maus's Inwardness and Theater in the English Renaissance (CH, Nov'95). M. A. Bushman Illinois Wesleyan University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Mary Thomas Crane is Associate Professor of English at Boston College. She is the author of Framing Authority: Sayings, Self, and Society in Sixteenth-Century England (Princeton) and coeditor, with Amy Boesky, of Form and Reform in Renaissance England: Essays in Honor of Barbara Kiefer Lewalski.

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