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Disenchanting citizenship : Mexican migrants and the boundaries of belonging / Luis F.B. Plascencia.

By: Plascencia, Luis F. B.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Latinidad: Publisher: New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2012Description: 1 online resource (x, 252 p.).ISBN: 9780813553344 (electronic bk.); 0813553342 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Mexican Americans -- Ethnic identity | Mexican Americans -- Civil rights | Mexican Americans -- Social conditions | Mexicans -- Migrations | Citizenship -- United States | Aliens -- United States | United States -- Politics and government | United States -- Ethnic relations | United States -- Emigration and immigration -- Government policyAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Disenchanting citizenship.DDC classification: 305.86872073 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: locating citizenships -- Fields of citizenship -- The Janus face of citizenship: the side of inclusion -- The Janus face of citizenship: the side of exclusion -- The making of citizens: promoting and schooling -- Bearing true faith and allegiance: entering the circle of citizenship -- Desire, sacrifice, and disenchantment -- Epilogue: the boundaries of birth and power.
Summary: Luis F.B. Plascencia & rsquo;s Disenchanting Citizenship explores two interrelated issues: U.S. citizenship and the Mexican migrants & rsquo; position in the United States. Through an extensive and multifaceted collection of interviews, ethnographic fieldwork, ethno-historical research, and public policy analysis, Plascencia probes the ways in which citizenshiop discourses are understood and taken up by individuals. The book uncovers citizenship & rsquo;s root as a Janus-faced construct that encompasses a simultaneous process of inclusion and exclusion. This notion of citizenship is mapped on to t.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E184.M5 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt5hjdhk Available ocn795120243

Includes bibliographical references (p. 225-245) and index.

Introduction: locating citizenships -- Fields of citizenship -- The Janus face of citizenship: the side of inclusion -- The Janus face of citizenship: the side of exclusion -- The making of citizens: promoting and schooling -- Bearing true faith and allegiance: entering the circle of citizenship -- Desire, sacrifice, and disenchantment -- Epilogue: the boundaries of birth and power.

Luis F.B. Plascencia & rsquo;s Disenchanting Citizenship explores two interrelated issues: U.S. citizenship and the Mexican migrants & rsquo; position in the United States. Through an extensive and multifaceted collection of interviews, ethnographic fieldwork, ethno-historical research, and public policy analysis, Plascencia probes the ways in which citizenshiop discourses are understood and taken up by individuals. The book uncovers citizenship & rsquo;s root as a Janus-faced construct that encompasses a simultaneous process of inclusion and exclusion. This notion of citizenship is mapped on to t.

Description based on print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Anthropologist Plascencia (Arizona State) is a new scholar who examines US citizenship and the Mexican migrant in the US. His book is clear, well written, and superbly edited, but it has little to do with Arizona's SB 1070, which is a missed opportunity. Both a strength and weakness of the book are the author's overreliance on his examinations of efforts that promote the acquisition of citizenship, the teaching of citizenship classes, and naturalization ceremonies. Although interesting, they narrow the focus of the monograph, and in the process Plascencia excludes important sources such as William Beezley's Mexican National Identity: Memory, Innuendo, and Popular Culture (2008), Carlos Velez-Ibanez's Border Visions (CH, May'97, 34-5405), and the growing body of literature on transnational studies. Plascencia's fieldwork experiences are more collateral than probative. There are important studies being conducted in the area of Mexican state clubs in the US. Plascencia appears to have a long and productive future ahead of him. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. R. Acuna emeritus, California State University, Northridge

Author notes provided by Syndetics

LUIS F. B. PLASCENCIA is an assistant professor of anthropology and affiliated faculty in the School of Transborder Studies and the School of Public Affairs at Arizona State University. He has published articles in numerous journals, including Urban Anthropology and International Migration Review. </p>

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