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Lucretia Mott's heresy : abolition and women's rights in nineteenth-century America / Carol Faulkner.

By: Faulkner, Carol.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, ©2011. 2012)Description: 1 online resource (291 pages, [8] pages of plates :) : illustrations, portraits.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780812205008; 0812205006.Subject(s): Quaker women -- United States -- Biography | Feminists -- United States -- Biography | Women abolitionists -- United States -- Biography | Women social reformers -- United States -- BiographyAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Lucretia Mott's heresy.DDC classification: 326.0924 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Machine generated contents note: 1. Nantucket -- 2. Nine Partners -- 3. Schism -- 4. Immediate Abolition -- 5. Pennsylvania Hall -- 6. Abroad -- 7. Crisis -- 8. The Year 1848 -- 9. Conventions -- 10. Fugitives -- 11. Civil War -- 12. Peace.
Summary: Lucretia Coffin Mott was one of the most famous and controversial women in nineteenth-century America. Now overshadowed by abolitionists like William Lloyd Garrison and feminists like Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Mott was viewed in her time as a dominant figure in the dual struggles for racial and sexual equality. History has often depicted her as a gentle Quaker lady and a mother figure, but her outspoken challenges to authority riled ministers, journalists, politicians, urban mobs, and her fellow Quakers. -- Publisher's description.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ1413.M68 F38 2011 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt3fhb0k Available ocn794700603

OldControl:muse9780812205008.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Machine generated contents note: 1. Nantucket -- 2. Nine Partners -- 3. Schism -- 4. Immediate Abolition -- 5. Pennsylvania Hall -- 6. Abroad -- 7. Crisis -- 8. The Year 1848 -- 9. Conventions -- 10. Fugitives -- 11. Civil War -- 12. Peace.

Lucretia Coffin Mott was one of the most famous and controversial women in nineteenth-century America. Now overshadowed by abolitionists like William Lloyd Garrison and feminists like Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Mott was viewed in her time as a dominant figure in the dual struggles for racial and sexual equality. History has often depicted her as a gentle Quaker lady and a mother figure, but her outspoken challenges to authority riled ministers, journalists, politicians, urban mobs, and her fellow Quakers. -- Publisher's description.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

The title of this biography is quite fitting. As Faulkner (history, Syracuse Univ.; Women's Radical Reconstruction: The Freedmen's Aid Movement) conclusively shows, Lucretia Mott (1793-1880) consistently took a hard-line, partisan stance against slavery and expressed controversial religious beliefs (Mott was born and raised a Quaker) that threatened to alienate more moderate abolitionists and believers while appearing outright heretical to those who disagreed with her. Faulkner not only describes the details of Mott's life, from her childhood on Nantucket Island to her death 87 years later at her home in Pennsylvania, but gets at the core of Mott's passionate-and often divisive-convictions, despite a relative dearth of primary, introspective sources (Mott rarely kept a diary, and Faulkner describes her letters as "rushed and newsy"). VERDICT The final product is impressive: this is the first biography of Mott in 30 years, and it proves to be thoroughly researched, well written, and fascinating. Faulkner's accessible writing style makes this book appropriate for any reader interested in women's history generally or the history of the U.S. abolitionist and women's suffrage movements.-Jennifer Stout, Cumberland Univ. Lib., Lebanon, TN (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Over 70 years ago, one admirer called Lucretia Mott "the greatest American woman.. Despite her centrality to the antislavery and women's rights movements, both the focus for an outpouring of recent scholarship, Mott has lacked a recent scholarly biography. In this work that goes far toward remedying that lack, Faulkner (Syracuse) argues that Mott was quite distinctive among reformers at the intersection of abolition, women's rights, and other causes in an uncompromising opposition to nearly every form of injustice. Present at both the founding of the American Anti-Slavery Society in 1833 and the landmark Seneca Falls Woman's Rights Convention of 1848, Mott had other, wide reform interests. The author locates the sources of Mott's reformism in a Nantucket culture open to women's enterprise and in her Hicksite Quakerism. However, Mott was far from being a quiet, gentle Quaker, as Faulkner sees her as angry at injustice and unyielding in opposing it. Some of the author's conclusions (none of them central to her thesis) are arguable--this reviewer's reading of Mott's Civil War correspondence shows her more supportive of the war than Faulkner concludes. But Faulkner certainly provides the best biography of Mott available. Summing Up: Highly recommended.. All levels/libraries. T. D. Hamm Earlham College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Carol Faulkner is Associate Professor of History at the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University, and author of Women's Radical Reconstruction: The Freedmen's Aid Movement, also available from the University of Pennsylvania Press.

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