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The quest for the lost nation : writing history in Germany and Japan in the American century / Sebastian Conrad ; translated by Alan Nothnagle.

By: Conrad, Sebastian.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: JSTOR eBooks.California world history library: 12.Publisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, c2010Description: 1 online resource (392 p.).ISBN: 9780520945814 (electronic bk.); 0520945816 (electronic bk.).Uniform titles: Auf der Suche nach der verlorenen Nation. English Subject(s): Germany -- Historiography | Japan -- Historiography | Historiography -- Germany -- History -- 20th century | Historiography -- Japan -- History -- 20th century | World War, 1939-1945 -- Influence | World War, 1939-1945 -- Social aspects -- Germany | World War, 1939-1945 -- Social aspects -- Japan | Cold War -- Social aspects -- Germany | Cold War -- Social aspects -- JapanAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Quest for the lost nation.DDC classification: 943.086072/043 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Introduction; 1. Mapping Postwar Historiography in Germany and Japan; 2. The Origin of the Nation: Bismarck, Meiji Ishin, and the Subject of History; 3. The Nation as Victim: Writing the History of National Socialism and Japanese Fascism; 4. The Invention of Contemporary History; 5. The Temporalization of Space: Germany and Japan between East and West; 6. History and Memory: Germany and Japan, 1945-2000; Notes; Bibliography; Acknowledgments; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z.
Summary: Highly praised when published in Germany, The Quest for the Lost Nation is a brilliant chronicle of Germany's and Japan's struggles to reclaim a defeated national past. Sebastian Conrad compares the ways German and Japanese scholars revised national history after World War II in the shadows of fascism, surrender, and American occupation. Defeat in 1945 marked the death of the national past in both countries, yet, as Conrad proves, historians did not abandon national perspectives during reconstruction. Quite the opposite--the nation remained hidden at the center of texts as scholars tried to mak.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DD86 .C6613 2010 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt1png3f Available ocn654118565

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Cover; Contents; Introduction; 1. Mapping Postwar Historiography in Germany and Japan; 2. The Origin of the Nation: Bismarck, Meiji Ishin, and the Subject of History; 3. The Nation as Victim: Writing the History of National Socialism and Japanese Fascism; 4. The Invention of Contemporary History; 5. The Temporalization of Space: Germany and Japan between East and West; 6. History and Memory: Germany and Japan, 1945-2000; Notes; Bibliography; Acknowledgments; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z.

Highly praised when published in Germany, The Quest for the Lost Nation is a brilliant chronicle of Germany's and Japan's struggles to reclaim a defeated national past. Sebastian Conrad compares the ways German and Japanese scholars revised national history after World War II in the shadows of fascism, surrender, and American occupation. Defeat in 1945 marked the death of the national past in both countries, yet, as Conrad proves, historians did not abandon national perspectives during reconstruction. Quite the opposite--the nation remained hidden at the center of texts as scholars tried to mak.

Description based on print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Few have studied how historians in West Germany and Japan coped with their countries' defeats during the decade immediately after WW II, let alone comparatively. This dissertation-turned-book filled the lacuna in German scholarship, and this translation serves that function for English-speaking scholars. As its title suggests, Conrad, a professor at Free University of Berlin, observes that together with nation-rebuilding efforts in other areas, historians embarked on a painstaking course to search for explanations for the rise of fascism in post-depression Germany and Japan, respectively as well as in parallel. The aim was to reconstruct national memories agreeable with the postwar situation. Conrad notes many striking similarities in the endeavor while giving due attention to notable differences. In West Germany, for example, Christian and exiled Jewish historians played an active role in reflecting on, critically, the country's past. In Japan, Marxist historians "who were shunned in West Germany" were the players. To repair its relationship with neighbors, Germany made more apologies, whereas Japan, leaning on the US, appeared indifferent to its neighbors' requests before the 1980s. Informative and insightful, this book is a worthy study of comparative history and historiography. Summing Up; Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. Q. E. Wang Rowan University

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