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Women for president : media bias in nine campaigns / Erika Falk.

By: Falk, Erika.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, ©2010Edition: 2nd ed.Description: 1 online resource (206 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780252096051; 0252096053.Subject(s): Women presidential candidates -- United States | Journalism -- Objectivity -- United States | Sex role -- Political aspects -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Women for president.DDC classification: 324.9730082 LOC classification: HQ1391.U5 | F35 2010Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Why worry about the press? -- Unnatural, incapable, and unviable -- Baking muffins and bombing countries -- High-heeled boots and violet suits -- Do newspapers give equal coverage to men and women presidential candidates? -- Issues, biography, and chaff -- Is American ready? -- Eighteen million cracks but still intact.
Review: "Newly updated to examine Hillary Clinton's 2008 presidential campaign, Women for President analyzes the gender bias the media has demonstrated in covering women candidates since the first woman ran for America's highest office in 1872. Tracing the campaigns of nine women who ran for president through 2008 Victoria Woodhull, Belva Lockwood, Margaret Chase Smith, Shirley Chisholm, Patricia Schroeder, Lenora Fulani, Elizabeth Dole, Carol Moseley Braun, and Hillary Clinton - Erika Falk finds little progress in the fair treatment of women candidates." "The press portrays female candidates as unviable, unnatural, and incompetent, and often ignores or belittles women instead of reporting their ideas and intent. This thorough comparison of men's and women's campaigns reveals a worrisome trend of sexism in press coverage - a trend that still persists today."--Jacket.
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HQ1391.U5 F35 2010 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/j.ctt4cgg2h Available ocn853455926

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Why worry about the press? -- Unnatural, incapable, and unviable -- Baking muffins and bombing countries -- High-heeled boots and violet suits -- Do newspapers give equal coverage to men and women presidential candidates? -- Issues, biography, and chaff -- Is American ready? -- Eighteen million cracks but still intact.

"Newly updated to examine Hillary Clinton's 2008 presidential campaign, Women for President analyzes the gender bias the media has demonstrated in covering women candidates since the first woman ran for America's highest office in 1872. Tracing the campaigns of nine women who ran for president through 2008 Victoria Woodhull, Belva Lockwood, Margaret Chase Smith, Shirley Chisholm, Patricia Schroeder, Lenora Fulani, Elizabeth Dole, Carol Moseley Braun, and Hillary Clinton - Erika Falk finds little progress in the fair treatment of women candidates." "The press portrays female candidates as unviable, unnatural, and incompetent, and often ignores or belittles women instead of reporting their ideas and intent. This thorough comparison of men's and women's campaigns reveals a worrisome trend of sexism in press coverage - a trend that still persists today."--Jacket.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

It's an exciting time to be a woman in the United States: the first "Madam Speaker" presides over Congress, her leadership reported on by the first female major network news anchor, who's also covering female heads of state in countries as diverse as Liberia, Germany, and Argentina, as well as Hillary Clinton's run for the White House. So it's also an exciting time to be studying gender, politics, and culture. Both of these books consider whether or not Americans are seriously ready for a woman to assume the position of (arguably) the most powerful person (formerly man) in the world. Or will media representation and misrepresentation stir up an always underlying public opinion that female candidates are "Unnatural, Incapable, Unviable," as Falk (communications, Johns Hopkins Univ.) investigates in Women for President. She focuses on the media's impact on female candidates, arguing that the press makes it less likely that a woman can win. Her evidence is from press coverage of eight female presidential hopefuls from Victoria Woodhull's run in 1872 (before women had the vote) to Elizabeth Dole's testing of the waters in 1999. She does an excellent job of pointing out what has changed and what has stayed the same in media coverage of women's political participation (why, for example, always the preoccupation with clothes and hair!). Meanwhile, in Rethinking Madam President, Han (political science, Chapman Univ.) and Heldman (political science, Occidental Coll.) present concise and engaging overviews of the central issues, aptly introduced by Heldman in her chapter on "Cultural Barriers to a Female Presidency in the U.S." Authors offer original contributions, elaborating on such topics as "Masculinity on the Campaign Trail" and "Women as Executive Branch Leaders." There are interesting examinations of the role of religion, the influence of the enduring belief in the righteousness of the doctrine of separate gender spheres, as well as in-depth analyses of the import of essentialist concepts of masculinity and femininity. Will 2008 be the age of Madam President? While neither book focuses on that concept exclusively, both frame the issues: what are Senator Clinton's chances of overcoming the domination, subordination, and exclusion of women, at the core of American politics for our nation's entire history? While much has changed, is it enough? Both titles are recommended for public and academic libraries.--Theresa Kintz, Wilkes Univ., Wilkes-Barre, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

This study could not be more timely. Falk (communication, Johns Hopkins Univ.) examines media coverage of female candidates for the presidency of the US over a 130-year period. Drawing from The New York Times and the largest circulating newspaper in the home state of the candidate, the author studied coverage of the candidate from the day she entered the race to the last day of her candidacy--more than 1,240 articles in all. The results of Falk's content analysis will not surprise anyone: compared to female candidates, male candidates received more than twice the coverage, their policies were examined more and their dress and physical appearance less, their candidacy was considered more viable, and so on. Falk concludes that little has changed over 130 years, and the 2008 presidential race has borne her out: the media have treated Hillary Clinton's ambition, knowledge, experience, firmness, and lack of emotion as weaknesses but have reported the same traits in male candidates as strengths. This volume joins Kathleen Hall Jamieson's Beyond the Double Bind: Women and Leadership (1995), a more sweeping scholarly examination of prejudices against women at all political levels. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower- and upper-division undergraduates; graduate students; general readers. R. Cathcart emeritus, CUNY Queens College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Erika Falk is the associate program chair for the master's degree program in communications at Johns Hopkins University and the former research director of the Washington office of the Annenberg Public Policy Center.</p>

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