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Braceros : migrant citizens and transnational subjects in the postwar United States and Mexico / Deborah Cohen.

By: Cohen, Deborah (Historian) [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, ©2011Description: 1 online resource (328 pages, 20 unnumbered pages of photographs) : map.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780807899670; 0807899674; 9781469603391; 146960339X.Subject(s): TransnationalismAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Braceros.DDC classification: 331.544097309045 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Agriculture, state expectations, and the configuration of citizenship -- Narrating class and nation: agribusiness and the construction of grower narratives -- Manhood, the lure of migration, and contestations of the modern -- Rites of movement, technologies of power: making migrants modern from home to the border -- With hunched back and on bended knee: race, work, and the modern north of the border -- Strikes against solidarity: containing domestic farmworkers' agency -- Border of belonging, border of foreignness: patriarchy, the modern, and making transnational Mexicanness -- Tipping the negotiating hand: state-to-state struggle and the impact of migrant agency.
Summary: At the beginning of World War II, the United States and Mexico launched the bracero program, a series of labor agreements that brought Mexican men to work temporarily in U.S. agricultural fields. In "Braceros", historian Deborah Cohen asks why these migrants provoked so much concern and anxiety in the United States and what the Mexican government expected to gain in participating in the program. Cohen creatively links the often unconnected themes of exploitation, development, the rise of consumer cultures, and gendered class and race formation to show why those with connections beyond the nation have historically provoked suspicion, anxiety, and retaliatory political policies.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HD1525 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9780807899670_Cohen Available ocn700932297

"Published in association with the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University."

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Agriculture, state expectations, and the configuration of citizenship -- Narrating class and nation: agribusiness and the construction of grower narratives -- Manhood, the lure of migration, and contestations of the modern -- Rites of movement, technologies of power: making migrants modern from home to the border -- With hunched back and on bended knee: race, work, and the modern north of the border -- Strikes against solidarity: containing domestic farmworkers' agency -- Border of belonging, border of foreignness: patriarchy, the modern, and making transnational Mexicanness -- Tipping the negotiating hand: state-to-state struggle and the impact of migrant agency.

At the beginning of World War II, the United States and Mexico launched the bracero program, a series of labor agreements that brought Mexican men to work temporarily in U.S. agricultural fields. In "Braceros", historian Deborah Cohen asks why these migrants provoked so much concern and anxiety in the United States and what the Mexican government expected to gain in participating in the program. Cohen creatively links the often unconnected themes of exploitation, development, the rise of consumer cultures, and gendered class and race formation to show why those with connections beyond the nation have historically provoked suspicion, anxiety, and retaliatory political policies.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Historian Cohen (Univ. of Missouri, St. Louis) focuses on "gendered social inequalities" using the language of subjectivity and agency in her research and publications. She has written articles on gender, race, sexuality, and Chicano and border studies, and coedited Gender and Sexuality in 1968 (2009) with L. J. Frazier. This is her second book, and here Cohen addresses the relationship between all the actors in the bracero program that between 1942 and 1964 brought over four million Mexican men to the US to work in agriculture. As the author writes, the book is about the transformation of these agricultural workers as they were recruited, processed, and dispatched to the fields. The book consists of eight well-researched chapters that synthesize Cohen's field interviews with archival work and a theoretical orientation of exploitation versus opportunity. This is an important contribution to the history of relations between Mexico and the US. However, the subjectivity/agency emphasis, although intended to expand the scope of understanding of this complex topic, actually falls short of that goal. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students and above. B. Roman Palo Alto College/University of Western Ontario

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