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Forbidden music : the Jewish composers banned by the Nazis / Michael Haas.

By: Haas, Michael, 1954- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, [2013]Description: 1 online resource (xii, 358 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780300154313; 0300154313; 9781299483583; 1299483585.Subject(s): Jews -- Germany -- Music | Composers -- GermanyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Forbidden music.DDC classification: 780.89924 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
""Cover ""; ""Title Page ""; ""Contents ""; ""Preface""; ""Introduction""; ""German and Jewish""; ""Wagner and German Jewish Composers in the Nineteenth Century""; ""An Age of Liberalism, Brahms and the Chronicler Hanslick""; ""Mahler and His Chronicler Julius Korngold""; ""The Jugendstil School of Schoenberg, Schreker, Zemlinsky and Weigl""; ""A Musical Migration""; ""Hey! We�re Alive!""; ""A Question of Musical Potency""; ""The Resolute Romantics""; ""Between Hell and Purgatory""; ""Exile and Worse""; ""Restitution""; ""Epilogue""; ""Notes""; ""Bibliography""; ""Index""
Summary: When National Socialism arrived in Germany in 1933, Jews dominated music more than virtually any other sector, making it the most important cultural front in the Nazi fight for German identity. This groundbreaking book looks at the Jewish composers and musicians banned by the Third Reich and the consequences for music throughout the rest of the 20th century.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
ML390 .H33 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt32bxjp Available ocn847002225

Includes bibliographical references (pages 307-334) and index.

When National Socialism arrived in Germany in 1933, Jews dominated music more than virtually any other sector, making it the most important cultural front in the Nazi fight for German identity. This groundbreaking book looks at the Jewish composers and musicians banned by the Third Reich and the consequences for music throughout the rest of the 20th century.

""Cover ""; ""Title Page ""; ""Contents ""; ""Preface""; ""Introduction""; ""German and Jewish""; ""Wagner and German Jewish Composers in the Nineteenth Century""; ""An Age of Liberalism, Brahms and the Chronicler Hanslick""; ""Mahler and His Chronicler Julius Korngold""; ""The Jugendstil School of Schoenberg, Schreker, Zemlinsky and Weigl""; ""A Musical Migration""; ""Hey! We�re Alive!""; ""A Question of Musical Potency""; ""The Resolute Romantics""; ""Between Hell and Purgatory""; ""Exile and Worse""; ""Restitution""; ""Epilogue""; ""Notes""; ""Bibliography""; ""Index""

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This is an intriguing exploration of the prominence, exclusion, and reemergent popularity of Jewish composers and their music in 19th- and 20th-century central Europe. Haas (research director, Jewish Music Institute for Suppressed Music, SOAS, Univ. of London, UK) thoroughly grounds his discussion in the historic social and political changes in Germanic society and the opportunities afforded Jews once they were allowed to engage. Many Jewish musicians converted to Christianity to better their options; for some, little religious or even cultural Jewish identity remained. This had minimal impact on Nazi criteria for Jewish identification. Though the book is broad in scope, the author concentrates on certain key figures and merely references others. Haas outlines the consequences for Jewish musicians, Jewish society, and, more broadly, for societies dominated by the Nazis. It is not surprising that for the most part, everyone lost out in the end. With extensive footnotes and index, this volume is required reading for those interested in Nazi suppression and efforts to eliminate Jewish cultural life and erase even the memory of a Jewish contribution to European civilization. A compelling work, well written and a good read. Summing Up: Essential. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty/professionals; general readers. L. D. Loeb emeritus, University of Utah

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