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Confronting captivity : Britain and the United States and their POWs in Nazi Germany / Arieh J. Kochavi.

By: Kochavi, Arieh J.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2005Description: 1 online resource (x, 382 p.) : ill., maps.ISBN: 0807876402 (electronic bk.); 9780807876404 (electronic bk.); 9781469603636 (electronic bk.); 1469603632 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): World War, 1939-1945 -- Prisoners and prisons, German | Prisoners of war -- Germany | Prisoners of war -- United States | Prisoners of war -- Great Britain | Prisoners of war -- Government policy -- United States | Prisoners of war -- Government policy -- Great BritainAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Confronting captivity.DDC classification: 940.54/7243 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Whitehall and British POWs -- Years of long captivity -- Washington and American POWs -- Exchanging seriously wounded and sick POWs -- Long-term POWs kept in abeyance -- Prisoners' safety and the collapse of Germany -- Forced marches -- An Anglo-Soviet bargain -- A U.S.-Soviet package deal.
Summary: How was it possible that most of the 300,000 British and US troops who fell into German hands during World War II survived in POW camps and returned home? This behind-the-scenes look at the living conditions in Nazi camps traces the actions taken - and not taken - by the British and US governments to ensure the safety of their captured soldiers.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
D805.G3 K619 2005 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9780807876404_Kochavi Available ocm65183782

Includes bibliographical references (p. [349]-363) and index.

Whitehall and British POWs -- Years of long captivity -- Washington and American POWs -- Exchanging seriously wounded and sick POWs -- Long-term POWs kept in abeyance -- Prisoners' safety and the collapse of Germany -- Forced marches -- An Anglo-Soviet bargain -- A U.S.-Soviet package deal.

Description based on print version record.

How was it possible that most of the 300,000 British and US troops who fell into German hands during World War II survived in POW camps and returned home? This behind-the-scenes look at the living conditions in Nazi camps traces the actions taken - and not taken - by the British and US governments to ensure the safety of their captured soldiers.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Kochavi (Univ. of Haifa) evaluates British and US policies for protecting their POWs in Nazi captivity. Employing extensive documentation from the Public Record Office, Kew, and the US National Archives, he recounts Western Allied negotiations with the Germans through Swiss mediation over such issues as the manacling of POWs and the exchange of sick and wounded. These contacts gave British and US officials confidence that Germany intended to adhere to most Geneva Convention principles, and that atrocities perpetrated against their troops primarily comprised isolated cases, not general policy. The place of Anglo-Americans in the Nazi "racial" hierarchy spared them the Soviets' fate, as the Nazis extended the principle of reciprocity even to US and British Jews. Apart from a lone illustration, Kochavi ignores the Berga camp, however, where Americans, among them 80 Jews, were deployed under conditions redolent of a concentration camp. Protracted negotiations with the Soviets for the repatriation of prisoners liberated in Eastern Europe, he shows, anticipated the Cold War. This study revises John Nichol and Tony Rennell's The Last Escape (2003) and complements Vasilis Vourkoutiotis's Prisoners of War and the German High Command (2003). ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and up. J. R. White University of Maryland University College

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