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The twilight of the middle class : post-World War II American fiction and white-collar work / Andrew Hoberek.

By: Hoberek, Andrew, 1967-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Princeton paperbacks: Publisher: Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2005Description: 1 online resource (x, 158 p.).ISBN: 9781400826810 (electronic bk.); 1400826810 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): American fiction -- 20th century -- History and criticism | Middle class in literature | Literature and society -- United States -- History -- 20th century | World War, 1939-1945 -- United States -- Literature and the war | White collar workers in literatureAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Twilight of the middle class.DDC classification: 813/.54093552 LOC classification: PS374.M494 | H63 2005Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: In The Twilight of the Middle Class, Andrew Hoberek challenges the commonly held notion that post-World War II American fiction eschewed the economic for the psychological or the spiritual. Reading works by Ayn Rand, Ralph Ellison, Saul Bellow, Phillip Roth, Flannery O'Connor, Thomas Pynchon, Don DeLillo, and others, he shows how both the form and content of postwar fiction responded to the transformation of the American middle class from small property owners to white-collar employees. In the process, he produces "compelling new accounts of identity politics and postmodernism that will be of.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PS374.M494 H63 2005 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt7pf7f Available ocn439018510

Includes bibliographical references (p. [131]-154) and index.

In The Twilight of the Middle Class, Andrew Hoberek challenges the commonly held notion that post-World War II American fiction eschewed the economic for the psychological or the spiritual. Reading works by Ayn Rand, Ralph Ellison, Saul Bellow, Phillip Roth, Flannery O'Connor, Thomas Pynchon, Don DeLillo, and others, he shows how both the form and content of postwar fiction responded to the transformation of the American middle class from small property owners to white-collar employees. In the process, he produces "compelling new accounts of identity politics and postmodernism that will be of.

Description based on print version record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Andrew Hoberek is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Missouri-Columbia.

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