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Through the looking glass : China's foreign journalists from Opium Wars to Mao / Paul French.

By: French, Paul, 1966-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Hong Kong : [London] : Hong Kong University Press ; [Eurospan, distributor], 2009Description: 1 online resource ([ix], 302 pages, [16] pages of plates) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789888052981; 9888052985.Other title: China's foreign journalists from Opium Wars to Mao.Subject(s): Foreign correspondents -- China -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Through the looking glass.DDC classification: 070.449951 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Acknowledgments; Names and Spelling; Introduction : Through the Looking Glass; 1 -- God, Mammon and Flag; 2 -- Civil and Other Wars -- Rebels, Mercenaries and More Dope; 3 -- Boxers and Treaty Porters -- Headlines Change History; 4 -- The Vultures Descend; 5 -- Writing in a Republic -- Printing What They Damn Well Liked; 6 -- The Roaring Twenties -- Substituting Action for Talk; 7 -- The Decadent Thirties -- Celebrities, Gangsters and the Ladies of the Press; 8 -- The Dirty Thirties -- Left Wing, Right Wing, Imperialists and Spies; 9 -- Too Hot -- China Fights for Its Life.
In: HKU Press digital editionsSummary: The convulsive history of foreign journalists in China starts with newspapers printed in the European factories of Canton in the 1820s. It also starts with a duel between two editors over the future of China and ends with a fistfight in Shanghai over the revolution. This book tells the story of China's foreign journalists.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PN5362 .F74 2009 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1xwftp Available ocn650509047

Includes bibliographical references (pages 277-282) and index.

The convulsive history of foreign journalists in China starts with newspapers printed in the European factories of Canton in the 1820s. It also starts with a duel between two editors over the future of China and ends with a fistfight in Shanghai over the revolution. This book tells the story of China's foreign journalists.

Acknowledgments; Names and Spelling; Introduction : Through the Looking Glass; 1 -- God, Mammon and Flag; 2 -- Civil and Other Wars -- Rebels, Mercenaries and More Dope; 3 -- Boxers and Treaty Porters -- Headlines Change History; 4 -- The Vultures Descend; 5 -- Writing in a Republic -- Printing What They Damn Well Liked; 6 -- The Roaring Twenties -- Substituting Action for Talk; 7 -- The Decadent Thirties -- Celebrities, Gangsters and the Ladies of the Press; 8 -- The Dirty Thirties -- Left Wing, Right Wing, Imperialists and Spies; 9 -- Too Hot -- China Fights for Its Life.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This book sweeps through the interesting history of international journalists who covered news in China from about 1820 to 1949. The author of three previous books about Asia, French provides brief profiles of the American and European journalists who made reporting from China the plum of journalism beats--especially during the first half of the 20th century. Teddy White, Edgar Snow, Ernest Hemingway, and Henry Luce are among the prominent writers and publishers French weaves into his discussion. He also notes the work of some international journalists, such as Karl Marx, who wrote about China even though they did not live there. The author focuses on the life and times of individual writers rather than on news organizations or the events reporters covered. Among the book's helpful features are a comprehensive collection of photographs, an appendix that explains changes in English names for Chinese cities and provinces, chapter notes, and an extensive bibliography. French's lucid prose holds the reader's attention. A useful resource for those interested in Chinese history as well as international journalism and journalism history. Summing Up: Recommended. All readers. R. A. Logan emeritus, University of Missouri--Columbia

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