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Into the pulpit : Southern Baptist women and power since World War II / by Elizabeth H. Flowers.

By: Flowers, Elizabeth Hill.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, ©2012Description: 1 online resource (xii, 263 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0807869988; 9780807869987; 9781469601823; 1469601826.Subject(s): Baptist women -- United States -- History | Sex role -- Religious aspects -- Southern Baptist Convention -- History of doctrinesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Into the pulpit.DDC classification: 262/.1432082 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Into the center pulpit : a dangerous dream -- Redigging the old wells : the Christian woman versus woman's lib -- A rattlesnake in the house : the beginning of the controversy -- First tier in the realm of salvation : gracious submission -- Behold a new thing? : moderate life.
Summary: The debate over women's roles in the Southern Baptist Convention's conservative ascendance is often seen as secondary to theological and biblical concerns. Elizabeth Flowers argues, however, that for both moderate and conservative Baptist women--all of whom had much at stake--disagreements that touched on their familial roles and ecclesial authority have always been primary. And, in the turbulent postwar era, debate over their roles caused fierce internal controversy. While the legacy of race and civil rights lingered well into the 1990s, views on women's submission to male authority provided.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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BX6462.3 .F56 2012 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9780807869987_Flowers Available ocn787847304
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BX6383.M38 2004 Making of the Primitive Baptists : BX6447 1993 Righteous discontent : BX6455.S76 C66 2011 Word, like fire : BX6462.3 .F56 2012 Into the pulpit : BX6462.3 .F56 2012 Into the Pulpit : BX6462.3 .M39 2014 The Woman I Am : BX6480.B585 O36 2006 Little Zion :

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Into the center pulpit : a dangerous dream -- Redigging the old wells : the Christian woman versus woman's lib -- A rattlesnake in the house : the beginning of the controversy -- First tier in the realm of salvation : gracious submission -- Behold a new thing? : moderate life.

The debate over women's roles in the Southern Baptist Convention's conservative ascendance is often seen as secondary to theological and biblical concerns. Elizabeth Flowers argues, however, that for both moderate and conservative Baptist women--all of whom had much at stake--disagreements that touched on their familial roles and ecclesial authority have always been primary. And, in the turbulent postwar era, debate over their roles caused fierce internal controversy. While the legacy of race and civil rights lingered well into the 1990s, views on women's submission to male authority provided.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Given all the ink spilled regarding the Southern Baptist conflict between conservatives and moderates since 1979, why another book on the topic? Flowers (religion, Texas Christian Univ.) asserts that women's issues, especially ordination, have not been thoroughly addressed. Though inerrancy was the initial issue in the battle, by the mid to late 1980s, it had been replaced by women's ordination. That became an issue of fellowship--several churches were disfellowshipped--and a factor in hiring, as seen in 1994-95 at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. Those women who wanted to pastor had no home in the Southern Baptist Convention, and they were not totally welcome in the moderate Corporate Baptist Fellowship. Flowers also addresses the role of conservative women in the controversy. Joyce Rogers and Dorothy Patterson, among others, led the fight to create programs promoting the traditional view of women. Rogers based women's submission to their husbands on the result of the Edenic fall, and Patterson asserted that it was the natural order of creation and pushed for complementarianism. This work is based on field research, interviews, and extensive archival research. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. W. T. Lindley Union University

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