Folk culture in the digital age : the emergent dynamics of human interaction / edited by Trevor J. Blank.

Contributor(s): Blank, Trevor JMaterial type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Logan [Utah] : Utah State University Press, [2012]Description: 1 online resource (xi, 262 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 087421890X; 9780874218909; 9781457184659; 1457184656; 9781457184673; 1457184672Subject(s): Folklore and the Internet | Folklore -- Computer network resourcesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Folk culture in the digital age.DDC classification: 398.20285 LOC classification: GR44.E43 | F653 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: Pattern in the virtual folk culture of computer-mediated communication / Trevor J. Blank -- How counterculture helped put the "vernacular" in vernacular webs / Robert Glenn Howard -- Netizens, revolutionaries, and the inalienable right to the Internet / Tok Thompson -- Performance 2.0: observations toward a theory of the digital performance of folklore / Anthony Bak Buccitelli -- Real virtuality: enhancing locality by enacting the small world theory / Lynne S. McNeill -- Jokes on the Internet: listing toward lists / Elliott Oring -- The Jewish joke online: framing and symbolizing humor in analog and digital culture / Simon J. Bronner -- From oral tradition to cyberspace: tapeworm diet rumors and legends / Elizabeth Tucker -- Love and war and anime art: an ethnographic look at a virtual community of collectors / Bill Ellis -- Face to face with the digital folk: the ethics of fieldwork on Facebook / Montana Miller.
Summary: Smart phones, tablets, Facebook, Twitter, and wireless Internet connections are the latest technologies to have become entrenched in our culture. Although traditionalists have argued that computer-mediated communication and cyberspace are incongruent with the study of folklore, Trevor J. Blank sees the digital world as fully capable of generating, transmitting, performing, and archiving vernacular culture. Folklore in the Digital Age documents the emergent cultural scenes and expressive folkloric communications made possible by digital "new media" technologies. New media is cha.
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GR44.E43 F653 2012 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt4cgkgn Available ocn818734127

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

Introduction: Pattern in the virtual folk culture of computer-mediated communication / Trevor J. Blank -- How counterculture helped put the "vernacular" in vernacular webs / Robert Glenn Howard -- Netizens, revolutionaries, and the inalienable right to the Internet / Tok Thompson -- Performance 2.0: observations toward a theory of the digital performance of folklore / Anthony Bak Buccitelli -- Real virtuality: enhancing locality by enacting the small world theory / Lynne S. McNeill -- Jokes on the Internet: listing toward lists / Elliott Oring -- The Jewish joke online: framing and symbolizing humor in analog and digital culture / Simon J. Bronner -- From oral tradition to cyberspace: tapeworm diet rumors and legends / Elizabeth Tucker -- Love and war and anime art: an ethnographic look at a virtual community of collectors / Bill Ellis -- Face to face with the digital folk: the ethics of fieldwork on Facebook / Montana Miller.

Smart phones, tablets, Facebook, Twitter, and wireless Internet connections are the latest technologies to have become entrenched in our culture. Although traditionalists have argued that computer-mediated communication and cyberspace are incongruent with the study of folklore, Trevor J. Blank sees the digital world as fully capable of generating, transmitting, performing, and archiving vernacular culture. Folklore in the Digital Age documents the emergent cultural scenes and expressive folkloric communications made possible by digital "new media" technologies. New media is cha.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This volume comprises ten essays examining how "folk culture" can be created and reproduced via digital technologies. Blank (English, SUNY, Potsdam) situates the book as a follow-up to his edited collection Folklore and the Internet: Vernacular Expression in a Digital World (2009). Blank describes that earlier book as largely attempting to legitimize digital content and spaces as appropriate sites of exploration for folklorists, and the present book appears to do more of the same by providing more recent examples of this type of analysis. This will be useful to scholars and students of folklore and humor studies, but there is little here that is new for those who are interested in digital media and do not struggle with accepting digital networks as interesting sites of culture worthy of analysis. Robert Glenn Howard's chapter "How Counterculture Helped Put the 'Vernacular' in Vernacular Webs" is strong and interesting, as is Montana Miller's "Face-to-Face with the Digital Folk: The Ethics of Fieldwork on Facebook." The rest of the book will appeal primarily to those interested in folklore. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower- and upper-division undergraduates. S. Pepper Northeastern Illinois University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Trevor J. Blank is lecturer in American Studies and Folklore at Pennsylvania State University-Harrisburg, the editor of Folklore and the Internet (USUP 2009), and the editor of New Directions in Folklore, an open-access journal.

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