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Reproducing women : medicine, metaphor, and childbirth in late imperial China / Yi-Li Wu.

By: Wu, Yi-Li, 1965-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, c2010Description: 1 online resource (xiii, 362 p.) : ill.ISBN: 9780520947610 (electronic bk.); 0520947614 (electronic bk.); 0520260686 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780520260689 (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): Childbirth -- China -- History | Reproductive health -- China -- History | Women -- Health and hygiene -- China -- History | China -- Social life and customs -- 1644-1912Additional physical formats: Print version:: Reproducing women.DDC classification: 362.198/400951 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Late imperial fuke and the literate medical tradition -- Amateur as arbiter : popular fuke manuals in the Qing -- Function and structure in the female body -- An uncertain harvest : pregnancy and miscarriage -- "Born like a lamb" : the discourse of cosmologically resonant childbirth -- To generate and transform : strategies for postpartum health -- Epilogue: body, gender, and medical legitimacy.
Summary: This innovative book uses the lens of cultural history to examine the development of medicine in Qing dynasty China. Focusing on the specialty of "medicine for women"(fuke), Yi-Li Wu explores the material and ideological issues associated with childbearing in the late imperial period. She draws on a rich array of medical writings that circulated in seventeenth- to nineteenth-century China to analyze the points of convergence and contention that shaped people's views of women's reproductive diseases. These points of contention touched on fundamental issues: How different were women's bodies fro.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
RG518.C6 W8 2010 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt1pptbq Available ocn663967918

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Late imperial fuke and the literate medical tradition -- Amateur as arbiter : popular fuke manuals in the Qing -- Function and structure in the female body -- An uncertain harvest : pregnancy and miscarriage -- "Born like a lamb" : the discourse of cosmologically resonant childbirth -- To generate and transform : strategies for postpartum health -- Epilogue: body, gender, and medical legitimacy.

This innovative book uses the lens of cultural history to examine the development of medicine in Qing dynasty China. Focusing on the specialty of "medicine for women"(fuke), Yi-Li Wu explores the material and ideological issues associated with childbearing in the late imperial period. She draws on a rich array of medical writings that circulated in seventeenth- to nineteenth-century China to analyze the points of convergence and contention that shaped people's views of women's reproductive diseases. These points of contention touched on fundamental issues: How different were women's bodies fro.

Description based on print version record.

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