Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Hidden in plain sight : the tragedy of children's rights from Ben Franklin to Lionel Tate / Barbara Bennett Woodhouse.

By: Woodhouse, Barbara Bennett, 1945-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Public square (Princeton, N.J.): Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, ©2008Description: 1 online resource (xvii, 357 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400829651; 1400829658.Subject(s): Children's rights -- United States -- History | Children -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- United States | African American children -- Civil rights -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Hidden in plain sight.DDC classification: 342.7308/772 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Illustrations -- Foreword / Ruth O'Brien -- Preface -- Introduction: Ain't I a person? -- 1: How to think about childhood -- 2: How to think about children's rights -- Part 1: Privacy Principle: Stories Of Bondage And Belonging -- 3: Boys in slavery and servitude: Frederick Douglass -- 4: Girls at the intersection of age, race and gender: Dred Scott's daughters -- 5: Growing up in state custody: "Tony" and "John G" -- Part 2: Agency Principle: Stories Of Voice And Participation -- 6: Printer's apprentice: Ben Franklin and youth speech -- 7: Youth in the civil rights movement: John Lewis and Sheyanne Webb -- Part 3: Equality Principle: Stories Of Equal Opportunity -- 8: Old maids and little women: Louisa Alcott and William Cather -- 9: Breaking the prison of disability: Helen Keller and the children of "Greenhaven" -- Part 4: Dignity Principle: Stories Of Resistance And Resilience -- 10: Hide and survive: Anne Frank and "Liu" -- 11: Children at work: newsboys, entrepreneurs, and "Evelyn" -- Part 5: Protection Principle: Stories Of Guilt And Innocence -- 12: Telling the scariest secrets: Maya Angelou and "Jeannie" -- 13: Age and the idea of innocence: "Amal" and Lionel Tate -- Conclusion: Future of rights -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: From the Publisher: Hidden in Plain Sight tells the tragic untold story of children's rights in America. It asks why the United States today, alone among nations, rejects the most universally embraced human-rights document in history, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. This book is a call to arms for America to again be a leader in human rights, and to join the rest of the civilized world in recognizing that the thirst for justice is not for adults alone. Barbara Bennett Woodhouse explores the meaning of children's rights throughout American history, interweaving the childhood stories of iconic figures such as Benjamin Franklin with those of children less known but no less courageous, like the heroic youngsters who marched for civil rights. How did America become a place where twelve-year-old Lionel Tate could be sentenced to life in prison without parole for the 1999 death of a young playmate? In answering questions like this, Woodhouse challenges those who misguidedly believe that America's children already have more rights than they need, or that children's rights pose a threat to parental autonomy or family values. She reveals why fundamental human rights and principles of dignity, equality, privacy, protection, and voice are essential to a child's journey into adulthood, and why understanding rights for children leads to a better understanding of human rights for all. Compassionate, wise, and deeply moving, Hidden in Plain Sight will force an examination of our national resistance-and moral responsibility-to recognize children's rights.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
KF479 .W66 2008 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt7rr8c Available ocn437267750

Includes bibliographical references (pages 337-348) and index.

Illustrations -- Foreword / Ruth O'Brien -- Preface -- Introduction: Ain't I a person? -- 1: How to think about childhood -- 2: How to think about children's rights -- Part 1: Privacy Principle: Stories Of Bondage And Belonging -- 3: Boys in slavery and servitude: Frederick Douglass -- 4: Girls at the intersection of age, race and gender: Dred Scott's daughters -- 5: Growing up in state custody: "Tony" and "John G" -- Part 2: Agency Principle: Stories Of Voice And Participation -- 6: Printer's apprentice: Ben Franklin and youth speech -- 7: Youth in the civil rights movement: John Lewis and Sheyanne Webb -- Part 3: Equality Principle: Stories Of Equal Opportunity -- 8: Old maids and little women: Louisa Alcott and William Cather -- 9: Breaking the prison of disability: Helen Keller and the children of "Greenhaven" -- Part 4: Dignity Principle: Stories Of Resistance And Resilience -- 10: Hide and survive: Anne Frank and "Liu" -- 11: Children at work: newsboys, entrepreneurs, and "Evelyn" -- Part 5: Protection Principle: Stories Of Guilt And Innocence -- 12: Telling the scariest secrets: Maya Angelou and "Jeannie" -- 13: Age and the idea of innocence: "Amal" and Lionel Tate -- Conclusion: Future of rights -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.

From the Publisher: Hidden in Plain Sight tells the tragic untold story of children's rights in America. It asks why the United States today, alone among nations, rejects the most universally embraced human-rights document in history, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. This book is a call to arms for America to again be a leader in human rights, and to join the rest of the civilized world in recognizing that the thirst for justice is not for adults alone. Barbara Bennett Woodhouse explores the meaning of children's rights throughout American history, interweaving the childhood stories of iconic figures such as Benjamin Franklin with those of children less known but no less courageous, like the heroic youngsters who marched for civil rights. How did America become a place where twelve-year-old Lionel Tate could be sentenced to life in prison without parole for the 1999 death of a young playmate? In answering questions like this, Woodhouse challenges those who misguidedly believe that America's children already have more rights than they need, or that children's rights pose a threat to parental autonomy or family values. She reveals why fundamental human rights and principles of dignity, equality, privacy, protection, and voice are essential to a child's journey into adulthood, and why understanding rights for children leads to a better understanding of human rights for all. Compassionate, wise, and deeply moving, Hidden in Plain Sight will force an examination of our national resistance-and moral responsibility-to recognize children's rights.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

With this thoroughly annotated, well-written book, Woodhouse (law, Univ. of Florida) performs an admirable job in helping readers to understand the complicated and ambiguous issue of children's rights in the US. Documenting some of the most egregious examples of the abuse and neglect of children with stories both personal and universal, she leads readers down the historical trail of legislative and judicial decisions made on children's behalf, and suggests others ripe for the making. While the chapter narratives by themselves are engaging and highly readable, they fail to weave a convincing, integrative, rights-based thread through the text. Also missing is a sound argument as to why the US continues to be one of only two countries in the world not willing to sign on to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (the other being Somalia). Woodhouse does finish, however, with a coherent, psychosocially based vision for the future of children's rights as human rights, which she terms "ecogenerism." How much this new term becomes known and used will, in part, demonstrate the success of this important book. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. J.C. Altman Adelphi University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Barbara Bennett Woodhouse is the L.Q.C. Lamar Professor of Law and codirector of the Barton Child Law and Policy Clinic at Emory Law School. She is also the David H. Levin Chair Emeritus in Family Law at the University of Florida.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.