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The enemy in our hands : America's treatment of enemy prisoners of war, from the Revolution to the War on Terror / Robert C. Doyle ; [foreword by Arnold Krammer].

By: Doyle, Robert C.
Contributor(s): Krammer, Arnold, 1941-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Lexington, Ky. : University Press of Kentucky, ©2010Description: 1 online resource (xx, 468 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780813173832; 0813173833; 9780813139616; 0813139619.Subject(s): Prisoners of war -- United States -- History | Prisoners of war -- Government policy -- United States -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Enemy in our hands.DDC classification: 355.1/2960973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction. The enemy: imposing the condition of captivity -- 1. Prisoners of independence: British and Hessian enemy prisoners of war -- 2. Habeas corpus: war against Loyalists and Quakers -- 3. Second American revolution: cartel and enemy prisoners of the War of 1812 -- 4. Manifest destiny versus nativism: Mexico, 1846-1848 -- 5. Prisoners of politics: a very uncivil war -- 6. Indians as POWs in America: from discovery to 1914 -- 7. Spaniards and Insurrectos: Spanish-American War (1898) and war in the Philippines (1899-1905) -- 8. Over there and over here: enemy prisoners of war and prisoners of state in the Great War -- 9. Pensionierte Wehrmacht: German and Italian POWs and internees in the United States -- 10. Reborn: Japanese soldiers as enemy prisoners of war and American Nisei internees -- 11. After the victory: optimism, justice, or vengeance? -- 12. Prisoners at war: forced repatriation and the prison revolts in Korea -- 13. Vietnam quagmire: enemy prisoners of war, Phoenix, and the Vietcong infrastructure -- 14. To Desert Storm and beyond: enemy prisoners of war and the conflict of rules -- 15. Iraqi freedom, Abu Ghraib, and the Guantanamo: the problem of the moral high ground -- 16. Evolution of new paradigms: reflections on the past, present, and future -- Appendixes -- 1. Loyalists units organized in the American Revolution -- 2. Cartel for the exchange of POWs in the War of 1812 -- 3. Confederate and union POW camps -- 4. General order 207: instructions for the government of armies of the United States -- 5. Andersonville deaths, 1864-1865 -- 6. Hague convention ratified by the United States, 3 December 1909 -- 7. German prisoners captured by US divisions, 1917-1918 -- 8. Executive order 9066 -- 9. World War II trials of US personnel -- 10. Nuremberg principles, 1946 -- 11. Geneva convention, 1949 -- 12. US code of conduct, 1954.
Summary: From the Publisher: "Winston Churchill once remarked, "A prisoner of war is a man who tries to kill you and fails, and then asks you not to kill him." "Discovery and exposure of the U.S. military's inhumane treatment of detainees at Baghdad's Abu Ghraib prison and the Guantanamo Bay detention camp generated a media frenzy that many argue irrevocably damaged America's reputation as a world leader. Worldwide scrutiny of the photos and descriptions of the abuse of enemy prisoners of war, or EPWs, from the war on terror incited allegations of human rights violations and possible war crimes and left many wondering whether the mistreatment of these prisoners was an isolated set of circumstances or, conversely, one example among many of atrocities rooted in our nation's history." "Drawing from diverse primary sources, military historian Robert C. Doyle illuminates America's prisoner of war policies from the founding era to the present. A work of history with direct relevance to contemporary events, The Enemy in Our Hands: America's Treatment of Prisoners of War from the Revolution to the War on Terror examines every major war and conflict, from the American Revolution through the Civil War, both world wars, Vietnam, and Afghanistan, to provide a comprehensive understanding of American treatment of EPWs." "Doyle offers a nuanced interpretation of American military history, suggesting that the treatment of EPWs in each conflict was a unique reflection of the prevailing political attitudes of the day. The military's incarceration practices with prisoners, particularly its methods used for interrogation, have evolved dramatically since the prisoner exchanges of the American Revolution. Using graphic details of the experiences of captured enemy combatants and civilians, The Enemy in Our Hands explores each war's adherence to international standards of conduct, including the 1929 Geneva Convention." The Enemy in Our Hands is a complete cultural analysis of a complicated issue the nation has struggled with since its inception. As the context of modern warfare continues to be shaped by current events, it is incumbent upon America to consider its treatment of EPWs and how that treatment defines national character.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
UB803 .D689 2010 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt2jcngh Available ocn697175249

Includes bibliographical references (pages 415-437) and index.

Introduction. The enemy: imposing the condition of captivity -- 1. Prisoners of independence: British and Hessian enemy prisoners of war -- 2. Habeas corpus: war against Loyalists and Quakers -- 3. Second American revolution: cartel and enemy prisoners of the War of 1812 -- 4. Manifest destiny versus nativism: Mexico, 1846-1848 -- 5. Prisoners of politics: a very uncivil war -- 6. Indians as POWs in America: from discovery to 1914 -- 7. Spaniards and Insurrectos: Spanish-American War (1898) and war in the Philippines (1899-1905) -- 8. Over there and over here: enemy prisoners of war and prisoners of state in the Great War -- 9. Pensionierte Wehrmacht: German and Italian POWs and internees in the United States -- 10. Reborn: Japanese soldiers as enemy prisoners of war and American Nisei internees -- 11. After the victory: optimism, justice, or vengeance? -- 12. Prisoners at war: forced repatriation and the prison revolts in Korea -- 13. Vietnam quagmire: enemy prisoners of war, Phoenix, and the Vietcong infrastructure -- 14. To Desert Storm and beyond: enemy prisoners of war and the conflict of rules -- 15. Iraqi freedom, Abu Ghraib, and the Guantanamo: the problem of the moral high ground -- 16. Evolution of new paradigms: reflections on the past, present, and future -- Appendixes -- 1. Loyalists units organized in the American Revolution -- 2. Cartel for the exchange of POWs in the War of 1812 -- 3. Confederate and union POW camps -- 4. General order 207: instructions for the government of armies of the United States -- 5. Andersonville deaths, 1864-1865 -- 6. Hague convention ratified by the United States, 3 December 1909 -- 7. German prisoners captured by US divisions, 1917-1918 -- 8. Executive order 9066 -- 9. World War II trials of US personnel -- 10. Nuremberg principles, 1946 -- 11. Geneva convention, 1949 -- 12. US code of conduct, 1954.

From the Publisher: "Winston Churchill once remarked, "A prisoner of war is a man who tries to kill you and fails, and then asks you not to kill him." "Discovery and exposure of the U.S. military's inhumane treatment of detainees at Baghdad's Abu Ghraib prison and the Guantanamo Bay detention camp generated a media frenzy that many argue irrevocably damaged America's reputation as a world leader. Worldwide scrutiny of the photos and descriptions of the abuse of enemy prisoners of war, or EPWs, from the war on terror incited allegations of human rights violations and possible war crimes and left many wondering whether the mistreatment of these prisoners was an isolated set of circumstances or, conversely, one example among many of atrocities rooted in our nation's history." "Drawing from diverse primary sources, military historian Robert C. Doyle illuminates America's prisoner of war policies from the founding era to the present. A work of history with direct relevance to contemporary events, The Enemy in Our Hands: America's Treatment of Prisoners of War from the Revolution to the War on Terror examines every major war and conflict, from the American Revolution through the Civil War, both world wars, Vietnam, and Afghanistan, to provide a comprehensive understanding of American treatment of EPWs." "Doyle offers a nuanced interpretation of American military history, suggesting that the treatment of EPWs in each conflict was a unique reflection of the prevailing political attitudes of the day. The military's incarceration practices with prisoners, particularly its methods used for interrogation, have evolved dramatically since the prisoner exchanges of the American Revolution. Using graphic details of the experiences of captured enemy combatants and civilians, The Enemy in Our Hands explores each war's adherence to international standards of conduct, including the 1929 Geneva Convention." The Enemy in Our Hands is a complete cultural analysis of a complicated issue the nation has struggled with since its inception. As the context of modern warfare continues to be shaped by current events, it is incumbent upon America to consider its treatment of EPWs and how that treatment defines national character.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

How has America handled the problem of captured enemies? Doyle (history, Franciscan Univ.; Voices from Captivity) unravels the various complex strains of enemy prisoners of war (EPWs) treatment, covering the U.S. military experience from the American Revolution to the present. He relies heavily on the moral high ground, a concept that sounds simple but involves difficult tradeoffs among morality, pragmatism, and situationalism. The moral and historical issues here will be of interest to military students, historians, political scientists, ethicists, and similar scholars. Heavily annotated, with a lengthy bibliography, this strongly recommended title should be read along with Paul Springer's America's Captives.-Edwin B. Burgess, U.S. Army Combined Arms Research Lib., Fort Leavenworth, KS (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Intense present-centered discourse on US treatment/mistreatment of war prisoners in the so-called war against terror demonstrates intellectual need for long historical context. Recent studies of captives taken in the Civil War (e.g., Roger Pickenpaugh, Captives in Gray, CH, Apr'10, 47-4620; James Gillispie, Andersonvilles of the North, CH, Aug'09, 46-6993), US Indian uprisings, and WW II enhance the call for a general history to bring it all together. Two excellent books by Paul J. Springer (Air Command and Staff College) and Robert C. Doyle (Franciscan Univ.) help meet that need. Each author addresses US treatment of enemy prisoners from the American Revolution through the wars and conflicts of the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries to the operations against Iraq and Afghanistan.Both authors rely on personal memoirs and scholarly writings, archival sources, and Internet Web sites, but not all the same ones. Both try to distinguish between "what we thought we did and what we actually did" (Doyle's words for balanced critical analysis of US policies). Both show the improvised and inconsistent nature of US policies in most past wars. The authors also discuss use of military tribunals, particularly in cases involving disloyalty, rebellion, or war crimes. Both expect substantial changes in future POW policies, but their works clearly show that "irregular" warfare is not new in US history. Both authors address moderately well-informed readers in exciting, readable narration and analysis. However, they differ somewhat in approach. Springer focuses tightly on main policies, points out shortcomings, and makes recommendations. He calls for realistic planning for POW management, rather than improvised response to unexpected circumstances. Doyle emphasizes individual experience in the cultural history of war and relies more on personal interviews. He also places heavier emphasis on civilian captives and methods of dealing with wartime disloyalty. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Both books. Academic libraries at all levels. G. H. Davis emeritus, Georgia State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Robert C. Doyle , professor of history at the Franciscan University of Steubenville, is the author of A Prisoner's Duty: Great Escapes in U.S. Military History and Voices from Captivity: Interpreting the American POW Narrative . He has been a history consultant on multiple films and documentaries, including Hart's War .</p>

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