Race and radicalism in the Union Army / Mark A. Lause.

By: Lause, Mark AMaterial type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, ©2009Description: 1 online resource (186 pages, [6] pages of plates) : illustrations, mapsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780252091704; 0252091701; 1283063883; 9781283063883Additional physical formats: Print version:: Race and radicalism in the Union Army.DDC classification: 973.7/1 LOC classification: E505.95 | .L386 2009Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The shadow of John Brown -- A free West in a slave nation -- War in the far West -- Whiteness challenged -- The Union as it never was -- Beyond the map.
Summary: In this portrait of interracial activism, Mark A. Lause documents the efforts of radical followers of John Brown to construct a triracial portion of the Federal Army of the Frontier. Mobilized and inspired by the idea of a Union that would benefit all, black, Indian, and white soldiers fought side by side, achieving remarkable successes in the field. Against a backdrop of idealism, racism, greed, and the agonies and deprivations of combat, Lause examines links between radicalism and reform, on the one hand, and racialized interactions among blacks, Indians, and whites, on the other. --From publisher's description.
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E505.95 .L386 2009 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/j.ctt1xcmkb Available ocn748780261

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The shadow of John Brown -- A free West in a slave nation -- War in the far West -- Whiteness challenged -- The Union as it never was -- Beyond the map.

In this portrait of interracial activism, Mark A. Lause documents the efforts of radical followers of John Brown to construct a triracial portion of the Federal Army of the Frontier. Mobilized and inspired by the idea of a Union that would benefit all, black, Indian, and white soldiers fought side by side, achieving remarkable successes in the field. Against a backdrop of idealism, racism, greed, and the agonies and deprivations of combat, Lause examines links between radicalism and reform, on the one hand, and racialized interactions among blacks, Indians, and whites, on the other. --From publisher's description.

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