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The roots of Nazi psychology : Hitler's utopian barbarism / Jay Y. Gonen.

By: Gonen, Jay Y, 1934-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Lexington, Ky. : University Press of Kentucky, c2000Description: 1 online resource (224 p.).ISBN: 9780813143675 (electronic bk.); 0813143675 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): National socialism -- Psychological aspects | Hitler, Adolf, 1889-1945 -- Psychology | Ideology -- Germany -- History -- 20th century | Jews -- Persecutions -- Germany | Germany -- Politics and government -- 1933-1945 | Racism -- Germany | Germany -- Territorial expansionAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Roots of Nazi psychology.DDC classification: 943.086/092 LOC classification: DD256.5 | .G595 2000Other classification: 15.70 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The role of ideologies -- The Jewish danger -- The leadership principle -- The expansion of the living space -- The folkish state -- Ideology as psychology.
Review: "Was Hitler a moral aberration or a man of his people? Jay Gonen contends that Hitler possessed an uncanny ability to read the masses correctly and guide them with "new" ideas that were merely reflections of what the people already believed. These notions grew from the general fabric of German culture in the years following the humiliation and defeat of World War I, a time when the masses were particularly susceptible to Hitler's promised utopian state. The reality of his vision, however, would preempt family autonomy and private action, creating a war machine designed to breed infantile soldiers brainwashed for sacrifice. To achieve that aim, Hitler unleashed barbaric forces whose utopian features were the very aspects of the state that made it most cruel. Book jacket."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DD256.5 .G595 2000 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt2jcg0h Available ocn852898522

Includes bibliographical references (p. [213]-218) and index.

The role of ideologies -- The Jewish danger -- The leadership principle -- The expansion of the living space -- The folkish state -- Ideology as psychology.

"Was Hitler a moral aberration or a man of his people? Jay Gonen contends that Hitler possessed an uncanny ability to read the masses correctly and guide them with "new" ideas that were merely reflections of what the people already believed. These notions grew from the general fabric of German culture in the years following the humiliation and defeat of World War I, a time when the masses were particularly susceptible to Hitler's promised utopian state. The reality of his vision, however, would preempt family autonomy and private action, creating a war machine designed to breed infantile soldiers brainwashed for sacrifice. To achieve that aim, Hitler unleashed barbaric forces whose utopian features were the very aspects of the state that made it most cruel. Book jacket."--BOOK JACKET.

Description based on print version record.

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