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Henry Watterson and the new South : the politics of empire, free trade, and globalization / Daniel S. Margolies.

By: Margolies, Daniel S, 1969-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Topics in Kentucky history: Publisher: Lexington, Ky. : University Press of Kentucky, c2006Description: 1 online resource (xii, 340 p.) : ill.ISBN: 9780813171579 (electronic bk.); 0813171571 (electronic bk.); 9780813138527 (electronic bk.); 0813138523 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Watterson, Henry, 1840-1921 | Newspaper editors -- United States -- Biography | Journalists -- United States -- BiographyAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Henry Watterson and the new South.DDC classification: 070.4/1092 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introducation: a new empire for the new South -- Toward the star-eyed goddess -- Sound money, home rule, and free trade -- Democracy unterrified and undefiled -- The idiosyncrasy of the market -- The new new departure -- War has its compensations -- We done expanded -- Conclusion: the compromises of empire.
Summary: Henry Watterson (1840-1921), editor of the Louisville Courier-Journal from the 1860s through WWI, was one of the most important and widely read newspaper editors in American history. An influential New South supporter of sectional reconciliation and economic development, Watterson was also the nation's premier advocate of free trade and globalization. Watterson's vision of a prosperous and independent South within an expanding American empire was unique among prominent Southerners and Democrats. He helped articulate the bipartisan embrace of globalization that accompanied America's rise to unm
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PN4874.W3 M37 2006 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt2jcpfg Available ocn753970371

Includes bibliographical references (p. 301-328) and index.

Introducation: a new empire for the new South -- Toward the star-eyed goddess -- Sound money, home rule, and free trade -- Democracy unterrified and undefiled -- The idiosyncrasy of the market -- The new new departure -- War has its compensations -- We done expanded -- Conclusion: the compromises of empire.

Description based on print version record.

Henry Watterson (1840-1921), editor of the Louisville Courier-Journal from the 1860s through WWI, was one of the most important and widely read newspaper editors in American history. An influential New South supporter of sectional reconciliation and economic development, Watterson was also the nation's premier advocate of free trade and globalization. Watterson's vision of a prosperous and independent South within an expanding American empire was unique among prominent Southerners and Democrats. He helped articulate the bipartisan embrace of globalization that accompanied America's rise to unm

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

"New South" often refers to the region's post-Reconstruction industrialism and its departure from antebellum slave-based pastoralism. Instead, Margolies (Virginia Wesleyan College) offers the ideas of the influential editor of The Louisville Courier-Journal, Henry Watterson, who advocated imperialism and who shared expansionists' beliefs similar to those of Alfred T. Mahan and Theodore Roosevelt. The author highlights Watterson's life from the Civil War through WW I. His editorials were influential; he advocated trade expansion and colonial rule that "was more quickly attainable through direct action," such as the nation's "taking" faraway islands--Hawaii and the Philippines. As a Democrat, Watterson often embraced Republican expansionist principles. "The Courier-Journal ... so clearly supported the imperial program (McKinley's) that it ran Kipling's White Man's Burden twice in a single day." As a free trade advocate, Watterson felt that such policies would benefit the South; interestingly, he failed to support the League of Nations, and as a contributing editor to The Woman Patriot, Watterson railed that women who demanded the vote were engaging in "the feminist goal of blatant infidelity." First in the series "Topics in Kentucky," this might be read in conjunction with William A. Link's The Paradox of Southern Progressivism, 1880-1930 (CH, Jun'93, 30-5789). Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. P. D. Travis Texas Woman's University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Daniel S. Margolies is assistant professor of history at Virginia Wesleyan College.</p>

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