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Public education under siege / edited by Michael B. Katz and Mike Rose.

Contributor(s): Katz, Michael B, 1939-2014 [editor.] | Rose, Mike (Michael Anthony) [editor.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013Edition: 1st ed.Description: 1 online resource (vii, 245 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780812208320; 0812208323.Subject(s): Educational change -- Social aspects -- United States | Public schools -- Social aspects -- United States | Teachers -- United States -- Social conditionsAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Public education under siege.DDC classification: 371.010973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
LC191.4 .P82 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt3fj555 Available ocn857071969

"A Dissent Book."

Includes bibliographical references.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

High-stakes testing became national education policy with the No Child Left Behind legislation. It expanded the federal role in education by ramping up federal education spending, promising to hold schools accountable for student achievement by requiring states to design and administer tests to all students in grades three through eight, and ensuring the presence of qualified teachers in all classrooms. Public Education under Siege grew out of articles commissioned by the editors of Dissent magazine, who asked Katz (history, Univ. of Pennsylvania) and Rose (Univ. of California, Los Angeles) to edit a series on public education. Part 1 deals with the "Perils of Technocratic Educational Reform"; part 2 focuses on the intersection of "Education, Race, and Poverty"; part 3 proposes "Alternatives to Technocratic Reform." The final chapter is a letter to aspiring teachers, a kind of graduation speech that the editors want aspiring teachers to hear, knowing they never will. Rose, the author of this chapter, writes that he is most interested in the way aspiring teachers think about what they have to do and what happens on Monday mornings in their classrooms and that their larger goal should be developing a "mindfulness about materials and techniques" that will work in their classrooms. Summing Up: Recommended. All readership levels. R. C. Morris University of West Georgia

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Michael B. Katz is Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History and Research Associate of the Population Studies Center at the University of Pennsylvania. He is also author of Why Don't American Cities Burn? and The Price of Citizenship: Redefining the American Welfare State, both available from the University of Pennsylvania Press. Mike Rose is Professor at the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles, and author of Back to School: Why Everyone Deserves a Second Chance at Education.

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