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The mulatta and the politics of race / Teresa C. Zackodnik.

By: Zackodnik, Teresa C.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Black women writers series: Publisher: Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2004Description: 1 online resource (xxxii, 235 p.).ISBN: 9781423732112 (electronic bk.); 1423732111 (electronic bk.); 9781604730579 (electronic bk.); 1604730579 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): American fiction -- African American authors -- History and criticism | Race in literature | American fiction -- Women authors -- History and criticism | Political fiction, American -- History and criticism | African American women -- Intellectual life | Politics and literature -- United States | Women and literature -- United States | Racially mixed people in literature | Race relations in literature | Racism in literature | Women in literatureAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Mulatta and the politics of race.DDC classification: 813.009/3552 LOC classification: PS374.R32 | Z33 2004Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Fixing the Color Line: The Mulatta, American Courts, and the Racial Imaginary; 2. "White Slaves" and Tragic Mulattas: The Antislavery Appeals of Ellen Craft and Sarah Parker Remond; 3. Little Romances and Mulatta Heroines: Passing for a "True Woman" in Frances Harper's Iola Leroy and Pauline Hopkins's Contending Forces; 4. Commodified "Blackness" and Performative Possibilities in Jessie Fauset's: The Chinaberry Tree and Nella Larsen's Quicksand
Summary: From abolition through the years just before the civil rights struggle began, African American women recognized that a mixed-race woman made for a powerful and, at times, very useful figure in the battle for racial justice.The Mulatta and the Politics of Race traces many key instances in which black women have wielded the image of a racially mixed woman to assault the color line. In the oratory and fiction of black women from the late 1840s through the 1950s, Teresa C. Zackodnik finds the mulatta to be a metaphor of increasing potency. Before the Civil War white female abolitionists created th.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS374.R32 Z33 2004 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt2tvhtc Available ocm62256857

Includes bibliographical references (p. 217-227) and index.

Description based on print version record.

Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Fixing the Color Line: The Mulatta, American Courts, and the Racial Imaginary; 2. "White Slaves" and Tragic Mulattas: The Antislavery Appeals of Ellen Craft and Sarah Parker Remond; 3. Little Romances and Mulatta Heroines: Passing for a "True Woman" in Frances Harper's Iola Leroy and Pauline Hopkins's Contending Forces; 4. Commodified "Blackness" and Performative Possibilities in Jessie Fauset's: The Chinaberry Tree and Nella Larsen's Quicksand

From abolition through the years just before the civil rights struggle began, African American women recognized that a mixed-race woman made for a powerful and, at times, very useful figure in the battle for racial justice.The Mulatta and the Politics of Race traces many key instances in which black women have wielded the image of a racially mixed woman to assault the color line. In the oratory and fiction of black women from the late 1840s through the 1950s, Teresa C. Zackodnik finds the mulatta to be a metaphor of increasing potency. Before the Civil War white female abolitionists created th.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Reminding readers that the "tragic mulatta" stereotype, so fraught with meaning in 19th-century American literature, was created by white female abolitionists, Zackodnik (Univ. of Alberta) studies African American women writer's use of this figure. She argues that the mulatta's "ambiguous racial identity has made her an ideal figure through which African American women have explored the racialization of gender, sexuality, and class in American society, as well as the ambivalence of passing in ways that go beyond the simple duality of subversive versus complicit acts." In her introduction the author defines and summarizes the literature of passing, in which the mulatta played a paramount role, and she provides a smart summary of the current state of critical practice regarding the tragic mulatta. And in the first chapter she demonstrates the complex interplay between legal definitions (as shown by her readings of court cases) and scientific knowledge in determining racial identity. With her historical and theoretical apparatus laid out, Zackodnik goes on to able readings of the abolitionist work of Ellen Craft and Sara Parker Remond. Other chapters pair Frances Harper's Iola Leroy with Pauline Hopkins's Contending Forces; Jessie Faucet's The Chinaberry Tree with Nella Larsen's Quicksand; and Fauset's Plum Bun and Larsen's Passing. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. D. J. Rosenthal John Carroll University

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