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The syntax of class : writing inequality in nineteenth-century America / Amy Schrager Lang.

By: Lang, Amy Schrager.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2003Description: 1 online resource (152 p.).ISBN: 9781400825639 (electronic bk.); 1400825636 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): American fiction -- 19th century -- History and criticism | Social classes in literature | Literature and society -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Social conflict in literature | Sex role in literature | Race in literatureAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Syntax of class.DDC classification: 810.9/355 LOC classification: PS374.S68 | L36 2003Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; INTRODUCTION: Class, Classification, and Conflict; CHAPTER I: Home, in the Better Sense: The Model Woman, the Middle Class, and the Harmony of Interests; CHAPTER II: Orphaned in America: Color, Class, and Community; CHAPTER III: Indexical People: Women, Workers, and the Limits of Literary Language; CHAPTER IV: Beginning Again: Love, Money, and a Circle of "Friends"; EPILOGUE; Notes; Index.
Review: "The Syntax of Class explores the literary expression of the crisis of social classification that occupied U.S. public discourse in the wake of the European revolutions of 1848. Lacking a native language for expressing class differences, American writers struggled to find social taxonomies able to capture - and manage - increasingly apparent inequalities of wealth and power."--Jacket.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PS374.S68 L36 2003 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt7t2r4 Available ocn680040809
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PS374.S58 R87 1999eb Neo-slave Narratives : PS374.S68D69 2009 Narrating Class in American Fiction. PS374.S68 H375 2008 A Class of Its Own : PS374.S68 L36 2003 The syntax of class : PS374.S68 S35 2011 Fantasies of the New Class : PS374.S68 S35 2011 Fantasies of the New Class : PS374.S68 S53 2017 The illiberal imagination :

Includes bibliographical references (p. [131]-147) and index.

"The Syntax of Class explores the literary expression of the crisis of social classification that occupied U.S. public discourse in the wake of the European revolutions of 1848. Lacking a native language for expressing class differences, American writers struggled to find social taxonomies able to capture - and manage - increasingly apparent inequalities of wealth and power."--Jacket.

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; INTRODUCTION: Class, Classification, and Conflict; CHAPTER I: Home, in the Better Sense: The Model Woman, the Middle Class, and the Harmony of Interests; CHAPTER II: Orphaned in America: Color, Class, and Community; CHAPTER III: Indexical People: Women, Workers, and the Limits of Literary Language; CHAPTER IV: Beginning Again: Love, Money, and a Circle of "Friends"; EPILOGUE; Notes; Index.

Description based on print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Lang (Emory Univ.) bases this slim, impressive volume on the premise that the 19th-century US's growing awareness of class differences, antagonisms, and ways of living inimical to the middle class threatened the putative "harmony of interests" necessary to the republic. As a result, a significant number of middle-class writers like Cummins, Hawthorne, Alger, Stuart Phelps, and Alcott work to reflect and manage class distinctions and tensions. The dominant strategy, which Lang finds in Cummins's The Lamplighter, resolves the troubling conditions of the working class by means of the essentialized figure of "home," presided over by the naturalized figure of the true woman, whose race- and class-based constructedness is elided; such issues are dissolved within the middle-class white woman, who by her very nature transcends material distinctions or, occasionally, creates female solidarity across class lines. African Americans Frank Webb and Harriet Wilson create counternarratives that question the possibility of blacks finding such homes in the US; the homes they propose are based on a besieged racial solidarity. Lang's discussion of Rebecca Harding Davis's Life in the Iron Mills is especially provocative, for she asserts the author's exemplary denial that art, especially that created by the middle-class writer, can represent and appropriate industrial workers. ^BSumming Up: Essential. All academic collections. M. L. Robertson Sweet Briar College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Amy Schrager Lang teaches American Studies at Emory University. She is the author of Prophetic Woman: Anne Hutchinson and the Problem of Dissent in the Literature of New England .

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