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Southern frontier humor : new approaches / edited by Ed Piacentino.

Contributor(s): Piacentino, Edward J, 1945- [editor.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, [2013]Description: 1 online resource (vii, 237 pages) : illustration.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781621039389; 1621039382; 9781617037696; 1617037699.Subject(s): American wit and humor -- Southwest, Old -- History and criticism | American literature -- Southwest, Old -- History and criticism | American literature -- Southern States -- History and criticismAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Southern frontier humor.DDC classification: 817.009/976 LOC classification: PS437 | .S68 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Preface; Introduction; Henry Junius Nott and the Roots of Southern Frontier Humor; Hysterical Power: Frontier Humor and Genres of Cultural Conquest; "Bawn in a Brier-patch" and Frontier Bred: Joel Chandler Harris's Debt to the Humor of the Old South; From Swamp Doctor to Conjure Woman: Exploring "Science" and Race in Nineteenth-Century America; Sherwood Bonner and the Postbellum Legacy of Southwestern Humor; "I wa' n't bawn in de mash to be fool' by trash!": Mark Twain's "A True Story" and the Culmination of Southern Frontier Humor.
Morphing Once Again: From Jack to Simon Suggs to Aunt LucilleAnancy's Web/Sut's Stratagems: Humor, Race, and Trickery in Jamaica and the Old Southwest; Postmodern Humor ante Litteram: Self-Reflexivity, Incongruity, and Dialect in George Washington Harris's Yarns Spun; The Real Big Kill: Authenticity, Ecology, and Narrative in Southern Frontier Humor; Contributors; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z.
Summary: Since its inception in the early 1830s, southern frontier humor (also known as the humor of the Old Southwest) has had enduring appeal. The onset of the new millennium precipitated an impressive rejuvenation of scholarly interest. Beyond Southern Frontier Humor: Prospects and Possibilities represents the next step in this revival, providing a series of essays with fresh perspectives and contexts. First the book shows the importance of Henry Junius Nott, a writer virtually unknown and forgotten who mined many of the principal subjects, themes, tropes, and character types associate.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS437 .S68 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt24hw4x Available ocn823014166

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Since its inception in the early 1830s, southern frontier humor (also known as the humor of the Old Southwest) has had enduring appeal. The onset of the new millennium precipitated an impressive rejuvenation of scholarly interest. Beyond Southern Frontier Humor: Prospects and Possibilities represents the next step in this revival, providing a series of essays with fresh perspectives and contexts. First the book shows the importance of Henry Junius Nott, a writer virtually unknown and forgotten who mined many of the principal subjects, themes, tropes, and character types associate.

Online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on June 17, 2013).

Cover; Contents; Preface; Introduction; Henry Junius Nott and the Roots of Southern Frontier Humor; Hysterical Power: Frontier Humor and Genres of Cultural Conquest; "Bawn in a Brier-patch" and Frontier Bred: Joel Chandler Harris's Debt to the Humor of the Old South; From Swamp Doctor to Conjure Woman: Exploring "Science" and Race in Nineteenth-Century America; Sherwood Bonner and the Postbellum Legacy of Southwestern Humor; "I wa' n't bawn in de mash to be fool' by trash!": Mark Twain's "A True Story" and the Culmination of Southern Frontier Humor.

Morphing Once Again: From Jack to Simon Suggs to Aunt LucilleAnancy's Web/Sut's Stratagems: Humor, Race, and Trickery in Jamaica and the Old Southwest; Postmodern Humor ante Litteram: Self-Reflexivity, Incongruity, and Dialect in George Washington Harris's Yarns Spun; The Real Big Kill: Authenticity, Ecology, and Narrative in Southern Frontier Humor; Contributors; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

These ten essays serve as a lively introduction to an array of writers, from Henry Junious Nott (1797-1837) to current novelists in the southern tradition, touching even on the trickster in Jamaica. The essays are detailed and concrete in their references, and broaden perceptions of the southern frontier genre. Piacentino (High Point Univ.) provides a bibliographical introduction and a discussion of Nott's character "Thomas Singularity" as precursor of the southwestern tradition. Gretchen Martin repositions Joel Chandler Harris by examining fiction outside the "Brer Rabbit" tradition; Jennifer Hughes, following an examination of the almanac tradition and the belief in humor that helps one "laugh and grow fat," reveals the power of a female comic character in one of Madison Tensas's more racist stories. In another reversal, Tracy Wuster describes how in "A True Story" Mark Twain removes the power of the gentleman narrator in framing the story. Euro-American Jack Tales, the ecological implications of the hunt, Sherwood Bonner's postbellum short stories, Charles Chesnutt, and Jamaican trickster stories round out the topics. Some minor discontinuities aside, these approachable essays cover a wide field and do a great deal to broaden appreciation of southern humor. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. D. E. Sloane University of New Haven

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