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Korean endgame : a strategy for reunification and U.S. disengagement / Selig Harrison.

By: Harrison, Selig S.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2002Description: 1 online resource (xxix, 409 p.) : maps.ISBN: 9781400824915 (electronic bk.); 1400824915 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): United States -- Foreign relations -- Korea (North) | Korea (North) -- Foreign relations -- United States | United States -- Military relations -- Korea (South) | Korea (South) -- Military relations -- United States | East Asia -- Strategic aspects | Korean reunification question (1945- ) | Korea (North) -- Foreign relations -- Korea (South)Additional physical formats: Print version:: Korean endgame.DDC classification: 327.7305193 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The paralysis of American policy -- Nationalism and the "permanent siege mentality" -- The Confucian legacy -- Reform by stealth -- Gold, oil, and the basket-case image -- Kim Jong Il and his successors -- Trading places -- Confederation or absorption? -- The United States and reunification -- Tripwire -- The United States and the military balance -- New opportunities for arms control -- Ending the Korean War -- The tar baby syndrome -- Guidelines for U.S. policy -- The U.S. nuclear challenge to North Korea -- The North Korean response -- The 1994 compromise : can it survive? -- Japan and nuclear weapons -- South Korea and nuclear weapons -- Guidelines for U.S. policy -- Will history repeat itself? -- Korea, Japan, and the United States -- Korea, China, and the United States -- Korea, Russia, and the United States -- Then and now : the case for a neutral Korea.
Summary: Nearly half a century after the fighting stopped, the 1953 Armistice has yet to be replaced with a peace treaty formally ending the Korean War. While Russia and China withdrew the last of their forces in 1958, the United States maintains 37,000 troops in South Korea and is pledged to defend it with nuclear weapons. In Korean Endgame, Selig Harrison mounts the first authoritative challenge to this long-standing U.S. policy. Harrison shows why North Korea is not--as many policymakers expect--about to collapse. And he explains why existing U.S. policies hamper North-South reconciliation and reunif.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E183.8.K7 H34 2002 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt7tb7q Available ocn436873950

"A Century Foundation book."

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The paralysis of American policy -- Nationalism and the "permanent siege mentality" -- The Confucian legacy -- Reform by stealth -- Gold, oil, and the basket-case image -- Kim Jong Il and his successors -- Trading places -- Confederation or absorption? -- The United States and reunification -- Tripwire -- The United States and the military balance -- New opportunities for arms control -- Ending the Korean War -- The tar baby syndrome -- Guidelines for U.S. policy -- The U.S. nuclear challenge to North Korea -- The North Korean response -- The 1994 compromise : can it survive? -- Japan and nuclear weapons -- South Korea and nuclear weapons -- Guidelines for U.S. policy -- Will history repeat itself? -- Korea, Japan, and the United States -- Korea, China, and the United States -- Korea, Russia, and the United States -- Then and now : the case for a neutral Korea.

Nearly half a century after the fighting stopped, the 1953 Armistice has yet to be replaced with a peace treaty formally ending the Korean War. While Russia and China withdrew the last of their forces in 1958, the United States maintains 37,000 troops in South Korea and is pledged to defend it with nuclear weapons. In Korean Endgame, Selig Harrison mounts the first authoritative challenge to this long-standing U.S. policy. Harrison shows why North Korea is not--as many policymakers expect--about to collapse. And he explains why existing U.S. policies hamper North-South reconciliation and reunif.

Description based on print version record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Selig S. Harrison is a former Washington Post Bureau Chief in Northeast Asia and the author of five books about the continent. He served as Senior Fellow and Director of Asian Studies at the Brookings Institution and, for twenty-two years, as a Senior Associate of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He has visited North Korea seven times and met the late President Kim Il Sung twice. He played a key role in setting the stage for the 1994 U.S. nuclear freeze agreement with Pyongyang.

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