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Becoming Mexipino : multiethnic identities and communities in San Diego / Rudy P. Guevarra, Jr.

By: Guevarra, Rudy.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Latinidad: Publisher: New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2012Description: 1 online resource.ISBN: 9780813553269 (electronic bk.); 0813553261 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): San Diego (Calif.) -- Ethnic relations | Mexican Americans -- California -- San Diego -- Social conditions | Filipino Americans -- California -- San Diego -- Social conditions | Community life -- California -- San Diego | Mexipinos ; Mexipino AmericansAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Becoming Mexipino : Multiethnic Identities and Communities in San DiegoDDC classification: 305.868/7207307794985 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Mexicans, Filipinos and the Mexipino experience -- Immigration to a rising metropolis -- The devil comes to San Diego: race and spatial politics -- Survival and belonging: civil rights, social organizations, and youth cultures -- Race and labor activism in San Diego -- Filipino-Mexican couples and the forging of a Mexipino identity.
Summary: Becoming Mexipino is a social-historical interpretation of two ethnic groups, one Mexican, the other Filipino, whose paths led both groups to San Diego, California from 1900 to 1965. Rudy Guevarra traces their earliest interactions under Spanish colonialism, when they did not strongly identify as Mexican or Filipino, to illustrate how these historical ties and cultural bonds laid the foundation for what would become close interethnic relationships and communities in twentieth-century San Diego as well as in other locales throughout California and the Pacific West Coast. Using archival sources.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F869.S22 G78 2012 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt5hjdqg Available ocn787844020

Becoming Mexipino is a social-historical interpretation of two ethnic groups, one Mexican, the other Filipino, whose paths led both groups to San Diego, California from 1900 to 1965. Rudy Guevarra traces their earliest interactions under Spanish colonialism, when they did not strongly identify as Mexican or Filipino, to illustrate how these historical ties and cultural bonds laid the foundation for what would become close interethnic relationships and communities in twentieth-century San Diego as well as in other locales throughout California and the Pacific West Coast. Using archival sources.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Mexicans, Filipinos and the Mexipino experience -- Immigration to a rising metropolis -- The devil comes to San Diego: race and spatial politics -- Survival and belonging: civil rights, social organizations, and youth cultures -- Race and labor activism in San Diego -- Filipino-Mexican couples and the forging of a Mexipino identity.

Description based on print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

According to Guevarra (Arizona State Univ.), Mexican Americans and Filipino Americans have shared common experiences of immigration, exclusion, low wage labor, and religiosity, all of which led to significant rates of intermarriage and the creation of new generations of "Mexipino" children in San Diego, California. This fine book explores the importance of these groups for California's development, for multiracial labor movements from the 1910s into the 1960s, for Catholic parishes, and for youth culture and civil rights. Based on energetic archival and oral historical research, the book will be useful to scholars and students interested in intermarriage, race relations, and labor history on the West Coast. As one of the best histories of the San Diego region, it joins work by Linda Espana-Maram (Creating Masculinity in Los Angeles's Little Manila, 2006) and others as a key title in Filipino American history. It advances the field of Chicana/o studies, and it engages the work of prize-winning scholars such as Peggy Pascoe (What Comes Naturally: Miscegenation Law and the Making of Race in America, CH, Oct'09, 47-1130). Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through researchers/faculty. S. Pitti Yale University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

RUDY P. GUEVARRA JR. is an assistant professor of Asian Pacific American Studies at Arizona State University. He is the author of Filipinos in San Diego: Images of America Series , and coeditor of Transnational Crossroads: Remapping the Americas and the Pacific and Crossing Lines: Race and Mixed Race Across the Geohistorical Divide .</p> </p>

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