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All American Yemeni girls : being Muslim in a public school / Loukia K. Sarroub.

By: Sarroub, Loukia K.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, ©2005Description: 1 online resource (158 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780812290233 (electronic bk.); 0812290232 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Yemeni Americans -- Michigan -- Dearborn -- Social conditions | Yemeni Americans -- Michigan -- Dearborn -- Ethnic identity | Yemeni Americans -- Education -- Michigan -- Dearborn | Muslims -- Michigan -- Dearborn -- Social conditions | Teenage girls -- Michigan -- Dearborn -- Social conditions | High school students -- Michigan -- Dearborn -- Social conditions | Dearborn (Mich.) -- Ethnic relations | Public schools -- Social aspects -- Michigan -- Dearborn | Education -- Social aspects -- Michigan -- Dearborn | United States -- Ethnic relations -- Case studiesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: All American Yemeni girls.DDC classification: 305.235/2/08992753307433 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: Being American, being Yemeni : uncovering a predicament -- American sojourners between honor and shame -- Classroom as oasis -- Islam and conflicting visions of literacy -- The tensions teachers face : public education and Islam -- From aspiration to desperation and living in ambiguity -- Living in ethnography : reflections on Dearborn before and after September 11.
Action note: digitized 2010 committed to preserve
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F574.D2 S37 2005 | E184.Y44 S37 2005 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt5hjm20 Available ocn643766098

Includes bibliographical references (pages 145-151) and index.

Introduction: Being American, being Yemeni : uncovering a predicament -- American sojourners between honor and shame -- Classroom as oasis -- Islam and conflicting visions of literacy -- The tensions teachers face : public education and Islam -- From aspiration to desperation and living in ambiguity -- Living in ethnography : reflections on Dearborn before and after September 11.

Use copy Restrictions unspecified star MiAaHDL

Electronic reproduction. [S.l.] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2010. MiAaHDL

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212

digitized 2010 HathiTrust Digital Library committed to preserve pda MiAaHDL

Description based on print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Education professor Sarroub (Univ. of Nebraska) offers a rich ethnography that documents the lives of a small group of devout Yemeni girls navigating culture, religion, and public education in Dearborn, MI. She interviews the hijabat (females who adhere to the Islamic dress code), following them through their gendered school days, prayers, religious education, and family events, and she talks to family and teachers. Readers are thus provided with a lucid understanding of the enormous significance of religion and family in these young women's lives, their attention to honor and self-vigilance, their investments in school as a source of both danger and hope, and their occupation of "in-betweenness" as they negotiate US and Yemeni values through the multiple literacies of spoken language, text, dress, dancing, and music. Sarroub's strengths are compelling description; theorized analysis informed by anthropology, sociology, and literary studies; and a balanced representation of the young women, who clearly took risks in participating in this research. While most of this very strong book is clear and a pleasure to read, some theoretical sections are in need of unpacking. Unfortunately, this will make the text less accessible to undergraduates, who would benefit greatly from reading this ethnography. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-level undergraduate and graduate students and above. R. C. Raby Brock University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Loukia K. Sarroub is Assistant Professor of education at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. She is currently conducting fieldwork on literacy in and out of school among American and Iraqi refugee youth.

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