Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The march of spare time : the problem and promise of leisure in the Great Depression / Susan Currell.

By: Currell, Susan.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005Description: 1 online resource (235 p.) : ill.ISBN: 9780812201710 (electronic bk.); 081220171X (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Leisure -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Depressions -- 1929 -- United States | United States -- Social conditions -- 1933-1945Additional physical formats: Print version:: March of spare time.DDC classification: 790.1/0973/09043 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The re-creation of leisure -- The problem and promise -- Preparing for spare time -- National recovery of recreation -- The march of culture -- Shopping for leisure -- Motion pictures and dance halls -- Mate selection -- The leisured world of tomorrow, today.
Action note: digitized 2010 committed to preserveReview: "In The March of Spare Time, Susan Currell explores how and why leisure became an object of such intense interest, concern, and surveillance during the Great Depression. As Americans experienced record high levels of unemployment, leisure was thought by reformers, policy makers, social scientists, medical doctors, labor unions, and even artists to be both a cause of and a solution to society's most entrenched ills. Of all the problems that faced America in the 1930s, only leisure seemed to offer a panacea for the rest." "Currell offers the first full-scale account of the fears and hopes surrounding leisure in the 1930s, one that will be an important addition to the cultural history of the period."--Jacket.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
GV53 .C79 2005 (Onlin) (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt3fj3vx Available ocn609321313

Includes bibliographical references (p. [191]-221) and index.

The re-creation of leisure -- The problem and promise -- Preparing for spare time -- National recovery of recreation -- The march of culture -- Shopping for leisure -- Motion pictures and dance halls -- Mate selection -- The leisured world of tomorrow, today.

"In The March of Spare Time, Susan Currell explores how and why leisure became an object of such intense interest, concern, and surveillance during the Great Depression. As Americans experienced record high levels of unemployment, leisure was thought by reformers, policy makers, social scientists, medical doctors, labor unions, and even artists to be both a cause of and a solution to society's most entrenched ills. Of all the problems that faced America in the 1930s, only leisure seemed to offer a panacea for the rest." "Currell offers the first full-scale account of the fears and hopes surrounding leisure in the 1930s, one that will be an important addition to the cultural history of the period."--Jacket.

Description based on print version record.

Use copy Restrictions unspecified star MiAaHDL

Electronic reproduction. [S.l.] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2010. MiAaHDL

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212

digitized 2010 HathiTrust Digital Library committed to preserve pda MiAaHDL

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Currell (American literature, Univ. of Sussex, UK) delves into how and why leisure became an object of intense interest, concern, and surveillance during the Great Depression. She draws on a broad spectrum of opinions, ranging from print, film, and radio to Recent Social Trends in the United States (1933), a research report produced during the presidency of Herbert Hoover and with a foreword by him. The author offers a cultural historic account of how unemployment, reform, and the "march toward leisure pursuit" clashed and how leisure was considered both a cause and a solution to society's most entrenched ills. Looking at leisure activities ranging from reading, sports, and crafts to gambling, gaming, loafing, and drinking, the author chronicles the nation's divided perceptions over what constituted appropriate versus improper use of leisure time. Critical information about federal control, technological unemployment, corporate recreation, and global trends makes for interesting reading and contributes significantly. Covering everything from the national recovery of recreation under government programs to leisure consumption and social improvement, this well-documented work will prove invaluable to those interested in the study of recreation, leisure, and sport management. ^BSumming Up: Essential. All collections. M. L. Krotee North Carolina State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Susan Currell is Senior Lecturer in American Literature at the University of Sussex.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.