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The Sanctity of Human Life.

By: Novak, David.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Washington : Georgetown University Press, 2007Description: 1 online resource (203 p.).ISBN: 9781589014664 (electronic bk.); 1589014669 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Medical ethics -- Religious aspects -- Judaism | Embryonic stem cells -- Research -- Religious aspects -- Judaism | National health services -- Religious aspects -- Judaism | Assisted suicide -- Religious aspects -- JudaismAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Sanctity of Human LifeDDC classification: 174.2 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
CONTENTS; PREFACE; Chapter 1 ON THE USE OF EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS; Chapter 2 A JEWISH ARGUMENT FOR SOCIALIZED MEDICINE; Chapter 3 PHYSICIAN-ASSISTED SUICIDE; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX.
Summary: Heated debates are not unusual when confronting tough medical issues where it seems that moral and religious perspectives often erupt in conflict with philosophical or political positions. In The Sanctity of Human Life, Jewish theologian David Novak acknowledges that it is impossible not to take into account the theological view of human life, but the challenge is how to present the religious perspective to nonreligious people. In doing so, he shows that the two positionsthe theological and the philosophicalaren't as far apart as they may seem. Novak digs deep into Jewish scripture and tradit.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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R725.57 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt2tt4j5 Available ocn648711585

CONTENTS; PREFACE; Chapter 1 ON THE USE OF EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS; Chapter 2 A JEWISH ARGUMENT FOR SOCIALIZED MEDICINE; Chapter 3 PHYSICIAN-ASSISTED SUICIDE; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX.

Heated debates are not unusual when confronting tough medical issues where it seems that moral and religious perspectives often erupt in conflict with philosophical or political positions. In The Sanctity of Human Life, Jewish theologian David Novak acknowledges that it is impossible not to take into account the theological view of human life, but the challenge is how to present the religious perspective to nonreligious people. In doing so, he shows that the two positionsthe theological and the philosophicalaren't as far apart as they may seem. Novak digs deep into Jewish scripture and tradit.

Description based on print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Novak (Univ. of Toronto) exemplifies how a theologian working within a particular religious tradition (in this case, Judaism) can formulate philosophically persuasive arguments on topics of general societal concern. While working out of a religious tradition's conception of God (and of divine law), the theologian must formulate arguments that stand up to the scrutiny of secular philosophers and ethicists. Remaining true to his or her own faith, the theologian thus contributes to the formation of a public policy that appropriately applies to all members of a national community, whatever each individual's religious belief (or lack thereof). Novak illustrates his approach by taking up the contemporary issues of the destruction of embryos in stem cell research, socialized medicine, and physician-assisted suicide. He argues that, because Judaism's understanding of humanity corresponds to a natural law perspective, Jewish texts and traditions are an appropriate starting point for formulating public policy on these controversial issues. Novak's densely argued, thoroughly documented statement on each of his exemplary topics represents an important contribution to contemporary biomedical debate. His work is equally significant in arguing the role of theologians and in illustrating the appropriate use of religious ideas and traditions in the formulation of secular public policy. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students and above; general readers. A. J. Avery-Peck College of the Holy Cross

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> David Novak holds the J. Richard and Dorothy Shiff Chair of Jewish Studies as professor of the study of religion and professor of philosophy at the University of Toronto. In 2006 he was appointed as a member of the Canada Assisted Reproduction Agency.</p>

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