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Diverse by design : literacy education within multicultural institutions / Christopher Schroeder.

By: Schroeder, Christopher L, 1970-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Logan, Utah : Utah State University Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (xxvi, 238 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780874218077; 0874218071.Subject(s): Hispanic Americans -- Education (Higher) -- Case studies | English language -- Study and teaching -- Spanish speakers -- Case studies | Literacy -- Social aspects -- United States -- Case studies | Hispanic Americans -- Ethnic identity -- Case studiesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Diverse by design.DDC classification: 808/.0420711 LOC classification: LC2672.4 | .S37 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
pt. 1. The problems -- pt. 2. Everyday experiences at NEIU -- pt. 3. Connections and conclusions.
Summary: Diversity, despite what we say, disturbs us. In the U.S., we debate linguistic rights, the need for an official language, and educational policies for language minority students. On the one hand, we believe in the rights of individuals, including (at least in the academy) the right to one & rsquo;s own language. On the other hand, we sponsor a single common language, monolingual and standard, for full participation and communication in both the academy and in U.S. society. In Diverse by Design, Christopher Schroeder reports on an institutional case study conducted at an officially des.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
LC2672.4 .S37 2011 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt4cgrmt Available ocn707092608

Includes bibliographical references (pages 224-236) and index.

pt. 1. The problems -- pt. 2. Everyday experiences at NEIU -- pt. 3. Connections and conclusions.

Print version record.

Diversity, despite what we say, disturbs us. In the U.S., we debate linguistic rights, the need for an official language, and educational policies for language minority students. On the one hand, we believe in the rights of individuals, including (at least in the academy) the right to one & rsquo;s own language. On the other hand, we sponsor a single common language, monolingual and standard, for full participation and communication in both the academy and in U.S. society. In Diverse by Design, Christopher Schroeder reports on an institutional case study conducted at an officially des.

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