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Poetic interplay : Catullus and Horace / Michael C.J. Putnam.

By: Putnam, Michael C. J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Martin classical lectures (Unnumbered)New series: Publisher: Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2006Description: 1 online resource (x, 171 p.).ISBN: 9781400827428 (electronic bk.); 1400827426 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Horace -- Knowledge -- Literature | Helen of Troy (Greek mythology) in literature | Catullus, Gaius Valerius -- Influence | Influence (Literary, artistic, etc.) | Odes -- History and criticism | Virgil -- In literature | Rome -- In literatureAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Poetic interplay.DDC classification: 874/.01 LOC classification: PA6411 | .P84 2006Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Preface; Introduction; CHAPTER ONE: Time and Place; CHAPTER TWO: Speech and Silence; CHAPTER THREE: Helen; CHAPTER FOUR: Virgil; CHAPTER FIVE: Genres and a Dialogue; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index of Poems Cited; General Index.
Summary: The lives of Catullus and Horace overlap by a dozen years in the first century BC. Yet, though they are the undisputed masters of the lyric voice in Roman poetry, Horace directly mentions his great predecessor, Catullus, only once, and this reference has often been taken as mocking. In fact, Horace's allusion, far from disparaging Catullus, pays him a discreet compliment by suggesting the challenge that his accomplishment presented to his successors, including Horace himself. In Poetic Interplay, the first book-length study of Catullus's influence on Horace, Michael Putnam shows that the earli.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PA6411 .P84 2006 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt7s64b Available ocn355821548

"Expanded version of the Charles Beebe Martin Classical Lectures, delivered at Oberlin College in March 2004"--Pref.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [159]-164) and indexes.

Preface; Introduction; CHAPTER ONE: Time and Place; CHAPTER TWO: Speech and Silence; CHAPTER THREE: Helen; CHAPTER FOUR: Virgil; CHAPTER FIVE: Genres and a Dialogue; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index of Poems Cited; General Index.

The lives of Catullus and Horace overlap by a dozen years in the first century BC. Yet, though they are the undisputed masters of the lyric voice in Roman poetry, Horace directly mentions his great predecessor, Catullus, only once, and this reference has often been taken as mocking. In fact, Horace's allusion, far from disparaging Catullus, pays him a discreet compliment by suggesting the challenge that his accomplishment presented to his successors, including Horace himself. In Poetic Interplay, the first book-length study of Catullus's influence on Horace, Michael Putnam shows that the earli.

Description based on print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Comprising lectures Putnam (Brown Univ.) originally delivered in Oberlin's Martin Classical Lectures series, this volume examines the lyric poetry of Horace in relation to that of an important Latin predecessor, Catullus, who goes unacknowledged, if not unengaged, in Horace's lyric collections. The first three chapters examine Horace's renovation of Catullan lyric compositional practice in connection with "time and place," "speech and silence," and the representation of Helen; the last two explore the adumbrations of Catullan lyric in Horace's odes to Virgil and his adaptations of Catullus's hymns and epithalamia in the Odes. Throughout, Putnam shows that Catullus's contribution to Horatian lyric is best measured not in concentrated imagery or striking lexical usage but in the casual dismemberment of Catullan images and vocabulary and the programmatic reversal of Catullan figures and themes in Horace's poetry. This study makes an important contribution to classical scholarship in its reassessment of Horace's engagement with Catullan lyric by reminding the reader of the extent of Horace's formal and thematic debts to Catullus and the range of strategies he employs for diffusing the visibility of the earlier poet's influence. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. A. M. Keith University of Toronto

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Michael C. J. Putnam is MacMillan Professor of Classics and Professor of Comparative Literature at Brown University. He is the author of ten books, including The Poetry of the Aeneid , and coeditor of The Virgilian Tradition (forthcoming).

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