We are the machine : the computer, the Internet, and information in contemporary German literature / Paul A. Youngman.

By: Youngman, Paul AMaterial type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksStudies in German literature, linguistics, and culture: Publisher: Rochester, N.Y. : Camden House, 2009Description: 1 online resource (xiii, 171 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781571137524; 1571137521Subject(s): Information technology in literature | German fiction -- Europe, German-speaking -- History and criticism | Computers in literature | Internet in literature | Literature and technology -- GermanyAdditional physical formats: Print version:: We are the machine.DDC classification: 833./.9209356 LOC classification: PT749.I64 | Y68 2009Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Losing ground to the machine: electronic brains in the works of Heinrich Hauser and Friedrich Dürrenmatt -- Fearing the machine: two nightmares in the 1990s: Gerd Heindenreich's new riddle of the sphinx and Barbara Frischmuth's hidden meaning -- Becoming the machine: Günther Grass's and Erich Loest's virtual history, René Pollesch's postdramatic imaginings, and "real" cyber-relationships according to Christine Eichel and Daniel Glattauer.
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PT749.I64 Y68 2009 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt81v9f Available ocn671648534

Includes bibliographical references (pages 158-166) and index.

Losing ground to the machine: electronic brains in the works of Heinrich Hauser and Friedrich Dürrenmatt -- Fearing the machine: two nightmares in the 1990s: Gerd Heindenreich's new riddle of the sphinx and Barbara Frischmuth's hidden meaning -- Becoming the machine: Günther Grass's and Erich Loest's virtual history, René Pollesch's postdramatic imaginings, and "real" cyber-relationships according to Christine Eichel and Daniel Glattauer.

Print version record.

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CHOICE Review

Youngman (Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte) explores the representation of information technology (IT) in a range of German-language literary texts, examining the impact of computers and networks on the Western conception of the liberal humanist subject. To contextualize his analysis of contemporary literature, he presents a short history of IT in the German-speaking world alongside a discussion of two pioneering literary works about computers from the mid-20th century. But he devotes the bulk of the study to close readings of texts from the past two decades, when IT became a facet of daily life in German-speaking Europe. A strength of the book is its attention to works from different genres and registers (poetry, novels, and a play; popular and canonical texts) and from different countries (Germany, Austria, and Switzerland). However, Youngman's approach is extremely selective, leading to a number of surprising omissions in choice of texts (e.g., for pop literature, the work of Dietmar Dath) and in discussion of contexts (e.g., wikis, data protection laws). Similarly, the eclectic theoretical framework does not always yield a clear approach to the wide-ranging questions about aesthetics, technology, and subjectivity that Youngman poses. Summing Up: Optional. Graduate students, researchers, faculty. H. D. Baer University of Oklahoma

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