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Quaker brotherhood : interracial activism and the American Friends Service Committee, 1917-1950 / Allan W. Austin.

By: Austin, Allan W.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, ©2012Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780252094156; 0252094158.Subject(s): Race relations -- Religious aspects -- Society of Friends -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 267/.189673 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Friendly principle of brotherhood -- Let's do away with walls: the AFSC's Interracial Section and race work in the United States, 1924-1929 -- Bridging race and peace: the AFSC in good times and bad, 1927-1931 -- Intelligent leadership in the cause of racial brotherhood: Quakers, social science, and the AFSC's interracial activism in the 1930s -- Refugees from abroad and at home: the hostel method and victims of war -- From race relations to community relations -- Race and reconciliation at mid-century.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
BX7747 .A97 2012 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/j.ctt2ttcj9 Available ocn826684852

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Friendly principle of brotherhood -- Let's do away with walls: the AFSC's Interracial Section and race work in the United States, 1924-1929 -- Bridging race and peace: the AFSC in good times and bad, 1927-1931 -- Intelligent leadership in the cause of racial brotherhood: Quakers, social science, and the AFSC's interracial activism in the 1930s -- Refugees from abroad and at home: the hostel method and victims of war -- From race relations to community relations -- Race and reconciliation at mid-century.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This well-written monograph at the intersection of religious and civil rights history is meant to fill the lacunae in the literature of the Society of Friends between the mid-19th and mid-20th centuries. Austin (Misericordia Univ.) explores the tension between a committed group's hoped-for betterment in social justice and the limitations that reality brings in accepting change, even among the self-proclaimed racially liberal Quakers. The author also stresses the context of the Friends' activities in these years, reminding readers of the "cross-fertilization" of ideas among Protestant sects. These debates between denominations illustrate how, in so many ways, religion can reinforce social norms rather than challenge them. Finally, readers see the American Friends Service Committee as an important taproot in the years before WW II that contributed to the energetic emergence of the civil rights movement in the years afterward. Austin's contribution reminds readers how important religion has been in promoting liberal causes for social justice throughout US history, rather than serving only as the wellspring of conservative rationale. Summing Up: Recommended. Most levels/libraries. J. Kleiman University of Wisconsin Colleges

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Allan W. Austin is a professor of history at Misericordia University and the author of From Concentration Camp to Campus: Japanese American Students and World War II.

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