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Playing the farmer : representations of rural life in Vergil's Georgics / Philip Thibodeau.

By: Thibodeau, Philip (Philip J.), 1970-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Joan Palevsky imprint in classical literature: Publisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, c2011Description: 1 online resource (326 p.).ISBN: 9780520950252 (electronic bk.); 0520950259 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Virgil. Georgica | Agriculture in literature | Didactic poetry, Latin -- History and criticism | Epic poetry, Classical -- History and criticism | Allusions | Rome -- In literatureAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Playing the farmer.DDC classification: 871/.01 LOC classification: PA6804.G4 | T48 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction -- Agricolae -- Playing the farmer -- Nobility in rustication -- A protreptic to agronomy -- To enchant readers -- The reception of the Georgics in early Imperial Rome -- Appendix 1. Vergil's economic status -- Appendix 2. Early readership of The georgics.
Summary: Setting Vergil's Georgics in the social context of its day, the book connects the poem's idyllic, and idealized, portrait of rustic life and agriculture with changing attitudes toward the countryside in late Republican and early Imperial Rome. It argues that what has been seen as a straightforward poem about agriculture is in fact an enchanting work of fantasy that elevated, and sometimes whitewashed, the realities of country life.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PA6804.G4 T48 2011 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt1pndk9 Available ocn747411302

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

Introduction -- Agricolae -- Playing the farmer -- Nobility in rustication -- A protreptic to agronomy -- To enchant readers -- The reception of the Georgics in early Imperial Rome -- Appendix 1. Vergil's economic status -- Appendix 2. Early readership of The georgics.

Setting Vergil's Georgics in the social context of its day, the book connects the poem's idyllic, and idealized, portrait of rustic life and agriculture with changing attitudes toward the countryside in late Republican and early Imperial Rome. It argues that what has been seen as a straightforward poem about agriculture is in fact an enchanting work of fantasy that elevated, and sometimes whitewashed, the realities of country life.

Description based on print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Like other Augustan poetry, Virgil's Georgics has in recent decades attracted contrary interpretations: critics disagree on whether the poem extols the status quo, under the emperor's reinvention of the Roman Republic, or critiques it. Thibodeau's historicist study usefully cuts across this division, destabilizing Virgil's artificially unitary notion of the "farmer" and subordinating questions about the poem's political loyalties to an analysis of its fictions. Thibodeau (Brooklyn College) reads the Georgics against the realities of agricultural life for landowning Romans (Virgil's targeted audience)--no simple matter, since the actual farming was done by underlings of various degrees. Thibodeau's main task in his early chapters is to explicate the role-playing that reading the poem, and accepting the poet's "you," entailed. The book then opens into a more general study of the poem's didactic fiction, which deserves a more systematic narratological treatment than it receives here; the last chapter, which does little more than survey evidence for knowledge of the poem in the following generations of Roman writers, could have benefited from a return to Thibodeau's earlier focus. Aimed toward a nonspecialist readership, the book is lucidly written, and background material is laid out well. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates and above; general readers. J. D. Reed Brown University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

ThibodeauPhilip:<br> <p> Philip Thibodeau is Associate Professor of Classics at Brooklyn College.</p>

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