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Sweet tyranny : migrant labor, industrial agriculture, and imperial politics / Kathleen Mapes.

By: Mapes, Kathleen, 1967-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Working class in American history: Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, ©2009Description: 1 online resource (xi, 307 pages :) : illustrations, maps.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780252091803; 0252091809.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Sweet tyranny.DDC classification: 331.5/440977 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Rural industrialization and imperial politics -- Contract farming in rural Michigan -- Family farms, child labor, and migrant families -- Farmers and the Great War -- Immigrant labor and the guest worker program -- Mexican immigrants and immigration debate -- Child labor reformers and industrial agriculture -- Remaking imperialism and the industrial countryside -- The politics of migrant labor.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HD1527.M54 M37 2009 (Onlin) (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/j.ctt1xcp8w Available ocn811410149
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HD1527.C2 N47 2013 Lettuce wars : HD1527.C2 V35 2011 Organized agriculture and the labor movement before the UFW : HD1527.H3 Islanders in the empire : HD1527.M54 M37 2009 (Onlin) Sweet tyranny : HD1527.S85 H86 2002 The human cost of food : HD1531.P3 O78 2008 Cultivar y cambiar : HD1534 1957 The Midland peasant :

Includes bibliographical references (pages 247-300) and index.

Rural industrialization and imperial politics -- Contract farming in rural Michigan -- Family farms, child labor, and migrant families -- Farmers and the Great War -- Immigrant labor and the guest worker program -- Mexican immigrants and immigration debate -- Child labor reformers and industrial agriculture -- Remaking imperialism and the industrial countryside -- The politics of migrant labor.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Mapes (history, SUNY-Genesco) tells the understudied sugar beet industry's fascinating story, and links events in Michigan between 1899 and 1940 to the broader national and global considerations. She begins with the touting of sugar beets as a panacea and the immediate disappointments among farmers as beets required so much toilsome attention. Because of the crop's "persnickety," highly perishable nature, processors and farmers soon worked out innovative contractual provisions to insure efficient operations and brought migrant families (originally mostly eastern European, later mainly Mexican) to the fields. Much of the book focuses on labor market politics--including guest worker programs and criticisms of child labor--but there's also considerable attention to relations between manufacturers and growers, the industry's protectionist efforts, and other government policies. Despite her painstaking research, Mapes's tendency to play up conflict and overlook mutually advantageous arrangements is frustrating. The implication that manufacturers exploited farmers, as they both simultaneously exploited laborers, largely founders when one notices the scale of alternative opportunities available to both farmers and workers. To both groups sugar beets had to be a "sweet [enough] deal" or they'd do something else. Consumers apparently bore the brunt of the industry's successful rent-seeking. Summing Up: Recommended. All undergraduates and above. R. M. Whaples Wake Forest University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Kathleen Mapes is an associate professor of history at the State University of New York, Geneseo.

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