Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Mapping morality in postwar German women's fiction : Christa Wolf, Ingeborg Drewitz, and Grete Weil / Michelle Mattson.

By: Mattson, Michelle.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Studies in German literature, linguistics, and culture: Publisher: Rochester, N.Y. : Camden House, 2010Description: 1 online resource (212 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781571137159; 1571137157.Subject(s): German literature -- Women authors -- History and criticism | Ethics in literatureAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Mapping morality in postwar German women's fiction.DDC classification: 833/.91409353 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The individual, memory, and history -- Feminism, the self, and community -- Ingeborg Drewitz: families, historical conflict, and moral mapping -- Christa Wolf: rehearsing individual and collective responsibility -- Grete Weil: the costs of abstract principles.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PT167 .M38 2010 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt81g6j Available ocn655778616

Includes bibliographical references (pages 193-207) and index.

The individual, memory, and history -- Feminism, the self, and community -- Ingeborg Drewitz: families, historical conflict, and moral mapping -- Christa Wolf: rehearsing individual and collective responsibility -- Grete Weil: the costs of abstract principles.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this coherent, convincing investigation, Mattson (Rhodes College) looks at how Wolf, Drewitz, and Weil--in stories that functioned almost as laboratory experiments--placed their female protagonists in situations that would yield answers to questions about previous moral failings and provide models for future behavior laboratory experiments. The new paradigms would need to be suited to those who care for others, and in arguing this Mattson looks at the Jewish German woman in Weil's Brautpreis, a character who envisions defying Nazi authority but is constrained by the need to care for her mother. Mattson begins the book with a discussion of general concepts of responsibility, and explains contemporary feminist formulations of a kind of morality that considers personal and public moral imperatives. In her literary analyses, Mattson shows that Drewitz describes circles of relationships, whereas Wolf triangulates spheres of ever-widening responsibility. Diverging from these authors, Weil investigates (particularly in Meine Schwester Antigone) the necessity for outspoken public defense of morality, but her characters, like those of the other writers, fail to achieve such worthy goals. Mattson offers new insights into three representative authors of contemporary German fiction. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. E. Wickersham emerita, Rosemont College

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.