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Cuauhtémoc's bones : forging national identity in modern Mexico / Paul Gillingham.

By: Gillingham, Paul, 1973-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Diálogos (Albuquerque, N.M.): Publisher: Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, 2011Description: xi, 338 p. : ill., map ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9780826350374 (pbk. : alk. paper); 0826350372 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): Cuauhtemoc, Emperor of Mexico, 1495?-1525 -- Tomb | Cuauhtemoc, Emperor of Mexico, 1495?-1525 -- Tomb -- Social aspects | National characteristics, Mexican | Nationalism -- Mexico | Mexico -- Civilization -- 20th century | Mexico -- Politics and government -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 972 LOC classification: F1210 | .G49 2011
Contents:
Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Who Makes Nations? -- Cuauhtémoc -- Resurrection -- Scandal -- The Usual Suspects -- Forgers -- Of Villagers and Bones -- Forging the Patria -- Using Cuauhtémoc I -- Using Cuauhtémoc II -- Conclusion: The Wealth of Nation Builders -- Appendix: The Florentino Juárez Journals -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: In 1949, a group of villagers and amateur archaeologists dug up what they believed to be the body of the last Aztec emperor, Cuauhtémoc, in a remote village in the mountains of central Mexico. State and local leaders enthusiastically promoted the remarkable discovery, and nationalist celebrations erupted across the country. The festivities ended when professional archaeologists declared the tomb a forgery, igniting the greatest scandal in the cultural politics of modern Mexico. In this innovative study of nationalism, Paul Gillingham pieces together an intricate puzzle that stretches across five centuries and moves from the forests of southern Mexico, where Cuauhtémoc was hanged, through the mountains of Guerrero, where he was re-created, to end in the streets and corridors of power of Mexico City. The analysis captures the complex interactions of everyday people and elites engaged in forging a nation.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F1210 .G49 2011 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001636307

Includes bibliographical references (p. 311-330) and index.

Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Who Makes Nations? -- 1. Cuauhtémoc -- 2. Resurrection -- 3. Scandal -- 4. The Usual Suspects -- 5. Forgers -- 6. Of Villagers and Bones -- 7. Forging the Patria -- 8. Using Cuauhtémoc I -- 9. Using Cuauhtémoc II -- Conclusion: The Wealth of Nation Builders -- Appendix: The Florentino Juárez Journals -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.

In 1949, a group of villagers and amateur archaeologists dug up what they believed to be the body of the last Aztec emperor, Cuauhtémoc, in a remote village in the mountains of central Mexico. State and local leaders enthusiastically promoted the remarkable discovery, and nationalist celebrations erupted across the country. The festivities ended when professional archaeologists declared the tomb a forgery, igniting the greatest scandal in the cultural politics of modern Mexico. In this innovative study of nationalism, Paul Gillingham pieces together an intricate puzzle that stretches across five centuries and moves from the forests of southern Mexico, where Cuauhtémoc was hanged, through the mountains of Guerrero, where he was re-created, to end in the streets and corridors of power of Mexico City. The analysis captures the complex interactions of everyday people and elites engaged in forging a nation.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Mexico is considered one of Latin America's most nationalistic countries. This emblematic distinction became generally apparent in the aftermath of the 1910 Mexican Revolution. Academics tend to agree that national recognition developed around the late-19th and early-20th century by upper- and middle-class intellectuals of diverse political affiliations. Mexican-ness and Indigenismo (praise of the indigenous past) flourished at all social levels once 1910 revolutionary ideology penetrated community and regional historical beliefs. Revolutionary thought and practice was forcefully predicated under the aegis of state institutions. Nothing was more revealing of the process than the purported 1940 discovery of the tomb and bones of the last Aztec emperor, Cuauhtemoc. The finding was hailed as the unearthing of the first Mexican national symbol of resistance to foreign intrusion. The process of excavation and certification of authenticity was fraught with material, documentary, and ideological fabrications and angry debates. More than seven decades after the bones' recovery at Ixcateopan, Guerrero, Emperor Cuauhtemoc's life history and ultimate destiny remain elusive, at best. Gillingham's account, based on broad, thorough research with an impressive combination of primary and secondary sources, articulates a well-written narrative with his profound understanding of Mexican history, lore, myth, and culture. Photographs, appendix, and extensive notes. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduates and specialists. M. S. Arbelaez University of Nebraska at Omaha

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Paul Gillingham is Andrew F. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities at the University of Pennsylvania.

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