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The bishop's utopia : envisioning improvement in colonial Peru / Emily Berquist Soule.

By: Soule, Emily Berquist, 1975-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Early modern Americas: Publisher: Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2014Description: 1 online resource (287 p., 16 unnumbered p. of plates :) ill. (chiefly col.), maps.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0812209435 (electronic bk.); 9780812209433 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Martínez Compañón y Bujanda, Baltasar Jaime, 1735-1797 | Martínez Compañón y Bujanda, Baltasar Jaime, 1735-1797. Trujillo del Perú a fines del siglo XVIII | Indians of South America -- Material culture -- Peru -- Trujillo (La Libertad) | Indians of South America -- Ethnobotany -- Peru -- Trujillo (La Libertad) | Indians of South America -- Peru -- Trujillo (La Libertad) -- Social conditions -- 18th century | Social planning -- Peru -- Trujillo (La Libertad) -- History -- 18th century | Utopias -- Peru -- Trujillo (La Libertad) -- History -- 18th century | Natural history -- Peru -- Trujillo (La Libertad) | Material culture in artAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Bishop's utopia.DDC classification: 985/.033 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: "In December 1788, in the northern Peruvian city of Trujillo, fifty-one-year-old Spanish Bishop Baltasar Jaime Martínez Compañón stood surrounded by twenty-four large wooden crates, each numbered and marked with its final destination of Madrid. The crates contained carefully preserved zoological, botanical, and mineral specimens collected from Trujillo's steamy rainforests, agricultural valleys, rocky sierra, and coastal desert. To accompany this collection, the Bishop had also commissioned from Indian artisans nine volumes of hand-painted images portraying the people, plants, and animals of Trujillo. He imagined that the collection and the watercolors not only would contribute to his quest to study the native cultures of Northern Peru but also would supply valuable information for his plans to transform Trujillo into an orderly, profitable slice of the Spanish Empire.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F3611.T8 S68 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt5vkd8d Available ocn877363695

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"In December 1788, in the northern Peruvian city of Trujillo, fifty-one-year-old Spanish Bishop Baltasar Jaime Martínez Compañón stood surrounded by twenty-four large wooden crates, each numbered and marked with its final destination of Madrid. The crates contained carefully preserved zoological, botanical, and mineral specimens collected from Trujillo's steamy rainforests, agricultural valleys, rocky sierra, and coastal desert. To accompany this collection, the Bishop had also commissioned from Indian artisans nine volumes of hand-painted images portraying the people, plants, and animals of Trujillo. He imagined that the collection and the watercolors not only would contribute to his quest to study the native cultures of Northern Peru but also would supply valuable information for his plans to transform Trujillo into an orderly, profitable slice of the Spanish Empire.

Description based on print version record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Emily Berquist Soule teaches history at California State University at Long Beach.

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