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Native America and the Question of Genocide.

By: Alvarez, Alex.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Studies in Genocide: Religion, History, and Human Rights: Publisher: Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2014Description: 1 online resource (223 p.).ISBN: 9781442225824.Subject(s): Genocide -- United States -- History | Indians of North America -- Social conditions | Indians of North America -- Violence against | Indians, Treatment of -- North America -- History | United States -- Politics and government | United States -- Race relations | United States -- Social policyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Native America and the Question of GenocideDDC classification: 973.04/97 | 973.0497 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 Beginnings; 2 Genocide; 3 Destructive Beliefs; 4 Disease; 5 Wars and Massacres; 6 Exiles in Their Own Land; 7 Education for Assimilation; 8 What's in a Name?; Notes; Index; About the Author
Summary: This provocative book asks whether or not the Native Populations of North America experienced genocide. Drawing on examples such as the Sand Creek Massacre and the Long Walk of the Navajo, the author shows the diversity of Native American experiences post-contact and uncovers the complex realities of this difficult period in the American history.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E93 .A42 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1655578 Available EBL1655578

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 Beginnings; 2 Genocide; 3 Destructive Beliefs; 4 Disease; 5 Wars and Massacres; 6 Exiles in Their Own Land; 7 Education for Assimilation; 8 What's in a Name?; Notes; Index; About the Author

This provocative book asks whether or not the Native Populations of North America experienced genocide. Drawing on examples such as the Sand Creek Massacre and the Long Walk of the Navajo, the author shows the diversity of Native American experiences post-contact and uncovers the complex realities of this difficult period in the American history.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Many Native American activists have claimed that their peoples have been subjected to genocide since the arrival of the first Europeans to the Americas. In this work, Alvarez (criminal justice, Northern Arizona Univ.) seeks to determine whether the assertions are correct. He provides a detailed examination of various definitions of genocide-which he defines as the implementation of a strategy designed to exterminate a group of people-how they are applied and why. According to the author, planning and intent are the key aspects lacking in much of the evidence put forth to support the accusations. It has been argued that disease was used as a weapon, but -Alvarez demonstrates that this devastation was inadvertently transmitted. The author looks for collusion among the colonial-era Dutch, English, French, and Spanish, on a plan to eradicate the native peoples. To believe that European powers enacted such an effort would have denied Native Americans their own agency, yet they actively played European powers against one another to advance their interests. Alvarez acknowledges that many atrocities were committed by Euro-Americans but sees those as distinct from massacre. VERDICT Although written about Native Americans, this book is essential reading for anyone interested in human rights as it is a primer on what genocide is and is not.-John R. Burch, Campbellsville Univ. Lib., KY (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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