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Challenging Orthodoxies : The Social and Cultural Worlds of Early Modern Women

By: Haude, Sigrun.
Contributor(s): Zook, Melinda S.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Farnham : Ashgate Publishing Ltd, 2014Description: 1 online resource (280 p.).ISBN: 9781472434630.Subject(s): Feminism -- Europe -- History | Women -- Europe -- History -- 16th century | Women -- Europe -- History -- 17th century | Women -- Europe -- History -- 18th century | Women -- Europe -- Social conditionsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Challenging Orthodoxies : The Social and Cultural Worlds of Early Modern WomenDDC classification: 305.409031 | 305.4094 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Cover; Contents; List of Figures; Notes on Contributors; Introduction; Part I Challenging Cultural and Social Traditions; 1 The Boundaries of Womanhood in the Early Modern Imaginary; 2 Women and Guns in Early Modern London; 3 Fiscal Citizens: Female Investors in Public Finance before the South Sea Bubble; Part II Challenging Scientific and Intellectual Traditions; 4 The Microscopist as Voyeur: Margaret Cavendish's Critique of Experimental Philosophy; 5 Women, Anglican Orthodoxy, and the Church in Ages of Danger; 6 Émilie Du Châtelet and the Enlightenment's Querelles des femmes
7 Charlotte Lennox and her Challenge to the Orthodoxies of Shakespeare CriticismPart III Challenging Political and Legal Traditions; 8 Daughters of Coke: Women's Legal Discourse in England, 1642-1689; 9 "Willing to go if they had their clothes": Early Modern Women and Indentured Servitude; 10 Epilogue-Women Theorize the Power of the "Powerless": The Case of Virginia Woolf; Selected Publications of Hilda L. Smith; Bibliography; Index
Summary: This collection, a testament to the work of Hilda L. Smith, confronts orthodoxy in social and cultural, scientific and intellectual, and political and legal traditions, to demonstrate how women of all social classes could challenge the conventional thinking of their time as well as the ways in which they have been traditionally portrayed by scholars. Subjects include women''s relationship to guns and gunpowder, the law, religion, public finances, the new science in early modern Europe, and women and indentured servitude in the New World.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ1587 .C43 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1692774 Available EBL1692774

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Contents; List of Figures; Notes on Contributors; Introduction; Part I Challenging Cultural and Social Traditions; 1 The Boundaries of Womanhood in the Early Modern Imaginary; 2 Women and Guns in Early Modern London; 3 Fiscal Citizens: Female Investors in Public Finance before the South Sea Bubble; Part II Challenging Scientific and Intellectual Traditions; 4 The Microscopist as Voyeur: Margaret Cavendish's Critique of Experimental Philosophy; 5 Women, Anglican Orthodoxy, and the Church in Ages of Danger; 6 Émilie Du Châtelet and the Enlightenment's Querelles des femmes

7 Charlotte Lennox and her Challenge to the Orthodoxies of Shakespeare CriticismPart III Challenging Political and Legal Traditions; 8 Daughters of Coke: Women's Legal Discourse in England, 1642-1689; 9 "Willing to go if they had their clothes": Early Modern Women and Indentured Servitude; 10 Epilogue-Women Theorize the Power of the "Powerless": The Case of Virginia Woolf; Selected Publications of Hilda L. Smith; Bibliography; Index

This collection, a testament to the work of Hilda L. Smith, confronts orthodoxy in social and cultural, scientific and intellectual, and political and legal traditions, to demonstrate how women of all social classes could challenge the conventional thinking of their time as well as the ways in which they have been traditionally portrayed by scholars. Subjects include women''s relationship to guns and gunpowder, the law, religion, public finances, the new science in early modern Europe, and women and indentured servitude in the New World.

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