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Android Best Practices.

By: Nolan, Godfrey.
Contributor(s): Truxall, David | Sood, Raghav | Cinar, Onur.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Dordrecht : Springer, 2014Description: 1 online resource (223 p.).ISBN: 9781430258582.Subject(s): Android (Electronic resource) | Application software -- Development | Mobile computingGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Android Best PracticesDDC classification: 005.258 LOC classification: QA76.76.A65 .N384 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents at a Glance; Chapter 1: Before You Start; Introduction to Android; Who Should Read This Book?; What You Need Before You Begin; An Actual Android Application; A Working Development Environment; All the Bells and Whistles; Source Code for the Sample Application; What's in This Book; Chapter 2: Android Patterns; UI Design Patterns; Holo; ActionBarSherlock Navigation; Designing for Different Devices; Fragments; Architectural Design Patterns; Classic Android; MVC; The Model; The View; The Controller; MVVM; The Model; The View; The ViewModel; Dependency Injection; The ToDoModule
The Database ProviderThe Stub Provider; ToDoApplication; Summary; Chapter 3: Performance; History; Performance Tips; Android Performance; Java Performance; SQLite Performance; Web Services Performance; Optimized Code; Tools; DDMS; System Performance; Heap Usage; Eclipse Memory Analyzer; Memory Allocation; Threads; Method Profiling; Traceview; Lint; Hierarchy Viewer; Unix Tools; Top; Dumpsys; Vmstat; Summary; Chapter 4: Agile Android; Benefits; Benefits to the Business; Benefits to the Developer; The Sweet Spot; Elements of Agile; Goals; Roll Call; TDD; BDD; Continuous Integration
Putting It All TogetherSummary; Chapter 5: Native Development; Deciding Where to Use Native Code; Where Not to Use Native Code; Where to Use Native Code; Java Native Interface; Difficulties Writing Native Code Using JNI; Generate the Code Using a Tool; Generating C/C++ Header Files Using javah; Generating the JNI Code using SWIG; Minimize the Number of JNI API Calls; Use Primitive Data Types as Native Method Parameters; Minimize Reach-Back from Native Code to Java Space; Memory Usage; Local References; Never Cache Local References; Release Local References in Complex Native Methods
Dealing with StringsUse Proper Memory Management Function; Operating on Arrays; Do Not Request Unnecessary Array Elements; Prevent Updating Unchanged Arrays; Native I/O; Caching Classes, Method and Field IDs; Threading; Never Cache the JNI Environment Interface Pointer; Never Access Java Space from Detached Native Threads; Troubleshooting; Extended JNI Check; Always Check for Java Exceptions; Always Check JNI Return Values; Always Add Log Lines While Developing; Native Code Reuse Using Modules; Benefit from Compiler Vectorization; Summary; Chapter 6: Security; The State of Android Security
Secure Coding PracticesIndustry Standard Lists; PCI List; OWASP; OWASP's General Secure Coding Guidelines; OWASP's Top 10 Mobile Risks; Google Security Tips; Our Top 10 Secure Coding Recommendations; Best Practices in Action; Security Policy Enforcer; Version 1 Settings.java; Version 2 Settings.java; Version 3 Settings.java; Summary; Chapter 7: Device Testing; Choosing a Strategy; Emulators; Install Intel x86 Atom System Image; Create Your Own Device; Downloading Manufacturer's AVDs; Automating Emulator Testing with Jenkins; Hardware Testing; Third-Party Testing Service
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Summary: Beginning Hibernate, Third Edition is ideal if you're experienced in Java with databases (the traditional, or "connected," approach), but new to open-source, lightweight Hibernate, a leading object-relational mapping and database-oriented application development framework.This book packs in information about the release of the Hibernate 4.x persistence layer and provides a clear introduction to the current standard for object-relational persistence in Java. And since the book keeps its focus on Hibernate without wasting time on nonessential third-party tools, you'll be able to immediately star
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
QA76.76.A65 .N384 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1694174 Available EBL1694174

Contents at a Glance; Chapter 1: Before You Start; Introduction to Android; Who Should Read This Book?; What You Need Before You Begin; An Actual Android Application; A Working Development Environment; All the Bells and Whistles; Source Code for the Sample Application; What's in This Book; Chapter 2: Android Patterns; UI Design Patterns; Holo; ActionBarSherlock Navigation; Designing for Different Devices; Fragments; Architectural Design Patterns; Classic Android; MVC; The Model; The View; The Controller; MVVM; The Model; The View; The ViewModel; Dependency Injection; The ToDoModule

The Database ProviderThe Stub Provider; ToDoApplication; Summary; Chapter 3: Performance; History; Performance Tips; Android Performance; Java Performance; SQLite Performance; Web Services Performance; Optimized Code; Tools; DDMS; System Performance; Heap Usage; Eclipse Memory Analyzer; Memory Allocation; Threads; Method Profiling; Traceview; Lint; Hierarchy Viewer; Unix Tools; Top; Dumpsys; Vmstat; Summary; Chapter 4: Agile Android; Benefits; Benefits to the Business; Benefits to the Developer; The Sweet Spot; Elements of Agile; Goals; Roll Call; TDD; BDD; Continuous Integration

Putting It All TogetherSummary; Chapter 5: Native Development; Deciding Where to Use Native Code; Where Not to Use Native Code; Where to Use Native Code; Java Native Interface; Difficulties Writing Native Code Using JNI; Generate the Code Using a Tool; Generating C/C++ Header Files Using javah; Generating the JNI Code using SWIG; Minimize the Number of JNI API Calls; Use Primitive Data Types as Native Method Parameters; Minimize Reach-Back from Native Code to Java Space; Memory Usage; Local References; Never Cache Local References; Release Local References in Complex Native Methods

Dealing with StringsUse Proper Memory Management Function; Operating on Arrays; Do Not Request Unnecessary Array Elements; Prevent Updating Unchanged Arrays; Native I/O; Caching Classes, Method and Field IDs; Threading; Never Cache the JNI Environment Interface Pointer; Never Access Java Space from Detached Native Threads; Troubleshooting; Extended JNI Check; Always Check for Java Exceptions; Always Check JNI Return Values; Always Add Log Lines While Developing; Native Code Reuse Using Modules; Benefit from Compiler Vectorization; Summary; Chapter 6: Security; The State of Android Security

Secure Coding PracticesIndustry Standard Lists; PCI List; OWASP; OWASP's General Secure Coding Guidelines; OWASP's Top 10 Mobile Risks; Google Security Tips; Our Top 10 Secure Coding Recommendations; Best Practices in Action; Security Policy Enforcer; Version 1 Settings.java; Version 2 Settings.java; Version 3 Settings.java; Summary; Chapter 7: Device Testing; Choosing a Strategy; Emulators; Install Intel x86 Atom System Image; Create Your Own Device; Downloading Manufacturer's AVDs; Automating Emulator Testing with Jenkins; Hardware Testing; Third-Party Testing Service

Borrow Devices from Manufacturers

Beginning Hibernate, Third Edition is ideal if you're experienced in Java with databases (the traditional, or "connected," approach), but new to open-source, lightweight Hibernate, a leading object-relational mapping and database-oriented application development framework.This book packs in information about the release of the Hibernate 4.x persistence layer and provides a clear introduction to the current standard for object-relational persistence in Java. And since the book keeps its focus on Hibernate without wasting time on nonessential third-party tools, you'll be able to immediately star

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Godfrey Nolan is president of RIIS LLC, where he specializes in website optimization. He has written numerous articles for magazines and newspapers in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Ireland. Nolan has had a healthy obsession with reverse engineering bytecode since he wrote Decompile Once, Run Anywhere, which first appeared in Web Techniques in September 1997.

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