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Beginning iOS 7 Development : Exploring the iOS SDK

By: Nutting, Jack.
Contributor(s): Mark, David | LaMarche, Jeff | Olsson, Fredrik.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Dordrecht : Springer, 2014Description: 1 online resource (705 p.).ISBN: 9781430260233.Subject(s): Application software -- Development | iOS (Electronic resource) | Programming languages (Electronic computers) -- Software | Smartphones -- ProgrammingGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Beginning iOS 7 Development : Exploring the iOS SDKDDC classification: 005.25 | 005.258 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents at a Glance; Introduction; Chapter 1: Welcome to the Jungle; What this Book Is; What You Need; Developer Options; What You Need to Know; What's Different About Coding for iOS?; Only One Active Application; Only One Window; Limited Access; Limited Response Time; Limited Screen Size; Limited System Resources; No Garbage Collection, but . . .; Some New Stuff; A Different Approach; What's in This Book; What's New in this Update?; Are You Ready?; Chapter 2: Appeasing the Tiki Gods; Setting Up Your Project in Xcode; The Xcode Project Window; The Toolbar; The Navigator; The Jump Bar
The Utility AreaInterface Builder; New Compiler and Debugger; A Closer Look at Our Project; Introducing Xcode's Interface Builder; File Formats; The Storyboard; The Library; Adding a Label to the View; Changing Attributes; Some iPhone Polish-Finishing Touches; Bring It on Home; Chapter 3: Handling Basic Interaction; The Model-View-Controller Paradigm; Creating Our Project; Looking at the View Controller; Understanding Outlets and Actions; Outlets; Actions; Cleaning Up the View Controller; Designing the User Interface; Adding the Buttons and Action Method; Adding the Label and Outlet
Writing the Action MethodTrying It Out; Adding Some style; Looking at the Application Delegate; Bring It on Home; Chapter 4: More User Interface Fun; A Screen Full of Controls; Active, Static, and Passive Controls; Creating the Application; Implementing the Image View and Text Fields; Adding the Image View; Resizing the Image View; Setting View Attributes; The Mode Attribute; Tag; Interaction Checkboxes; The Alpha Value; Background; Tint; Drawing Checkboxes; Stretching; Adding the Text Fields; Text Field Inspector Settings; Setting the Attributes for the Second Text Field
Creating and Connecting OutletsClosing the Keyboard; Closing the Keyboard When Done Is Tapped; Touching the Background to Close the Keyboard; Adding the Slider and Label; Adding Constraints; Creating and Connecting the Actions and Outlets; Implementing the Action Method; Implementing the Switches, Button, and Segmented Control; Adding Two Labeled Switches; Connecting and Creating Outlets and Actions; Implementing the Switch Actions; Adding the Button; Spiffing Up the Button; Stretchable Images; Control States; Connecting and Creating the Button Outlets and Actions
Implementing the Segmented Control ActionImplementing the Action Sheet and Alert; Conforming to the Action Sheet Delegate Method; Showing the Action Sheet; One Last Tweak; Crossing the Finish Line; Chapter 5: Autorotation and Autosizing; The Mechanics of Autorotation; Points, Pixels, and the Retina Display; Autorotation Approaches; Choosing Your View Orientations; Supported Orientations at the App Level; Per-Controller Rotation Support; Designing an Interface Using Constraints; Overriding Default Constraints; Full-Width Labels; Restructuring a View When Rotated
Creating and Connecting Outlets
Summary: The Truth About HTML5 is for web designers, web developers, and front-end coders who want to get up to speed with HTML5. The book isn't afraid to point out what everyone gets wrong about HTML5's new markup, so you don't make the same mistakes. It will show you what rocks in HTML5 today and what the future holds.Marking up a basic web page shouldn't be a quasi-religious exercise where the high priests of HTML5 must be consulted for their interpretation of the holy texts (the HTML5 spec). Don't waste hours trawling through confusing, poorly researched, and often flat-out wrong information on the
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
QA76.76.A65 D (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1694185 Available EBL1694185

Contents at a Glance; Introduction; Chapter 1: Welcome to the Jungle; What this Book Is; What You Need; Developer Options; What You Need to Know; What's Different About Coding for iOS?; Only One Active Application; Only One Window; Limited Access; Limited Response Time; Limited Screen Size; Limited System Resources; No Garbage Collection, but . . .; Some New Stuff; A Different Approach; What's in This Book; What's New in this Update?; Are You Ready?; Chapter 2: Appeasing the Tiki Gods; Setting Up Your Project in Xcode; The Xcode Project Window; The Toolbar; The Navigator; The Jump Bar

The Utility AreaInterface Builder; New Compiler and Debugger; A Closer Look at Our Project; Introducing Xcode's Interface Builder; File Formats; The Storyboard; The Library; Adding a Label to the View; Changing Attributes; Some iPhone Polish-Finishing Touches; Bring It on Home; Chapter 3: Handling Basic Interaction; The Model-View-Controller Paradigm; Creating Our Project; Looking at the View Controller; Understanding Outlets and Actions; Outlets; Actions; Cleaning Up the View Controller; Designing the User Interface; Adding the Buttons and Action Method; Adding the Label and Outlet

Writing the Action MethodTrying It Out; Adding Some style; Looking at the Application Delegate; Bring It on Home; Chapter 4: More User Interface Fun; A Screen Full of Controls; Active, Static, and Passive Controls; Creating the Application; Implementing the Image View and Text Fields; Adding the Image View; Resizing the Image View; Setting View Attributes; The Mode Attribute; Tag; Interaction Checkboxes; The Alpha Value; Background; Tint; Drawing Checkboxes; Stretching; Adding the Text Fields; Text Field Inspector Settings; Setting the Attributes for the Second Text Field

Creating and Connecting OutletsClosing the Keyboard; Closing the Keyboard When Done Is Tapped; Touching the Background to Close the Keyboard; Adding the Slider and Label; Adding Constraints; Creating and Connecting the Actions and Outlets; Implementing the Action Method; Implementing the Switches, Button, and Segmented Control; Adding Two Labeled Switches; Connecting and Creating Outlets and Actions; Implementing the Switch Actions; Adding the Button; Spiffing Up the Button; Stretchable Images; Control States; Connecting and Creating the Button Outlets and Actions

Implementing the Segmented Control ActionImplementing the Action Sheet and Alert; Conforming to the Action Sheet Delegate Method; Showing the Action Sheet; One Last Tweak; Crossing the Finish Line; Chapter 5: Autorotation and Autosizing; The Mechanics of Autorotation; Points, Pixels, and the Retina Display; Autorotation Approaches; Choosing Your View Orientations; Supported Orientations at the App Level; Per-Controller Rotation Support; Designing an Interface Using Constraints; Overriding Default Constraints; Full-Width Labels; Restructuring a View When Rotated

Creating and Connecting Outlets

The Truth About HTML5 is for web designers, web developers, and front-end coders who want to get up to speed with HTML5. The book isn't afraid to point out what everyone gets wrong about HTML5's new markup, so you don't make the same mistakes. It will show you what rocks in HTML5 today and what the future holds.Marking up a basic web page shouldn't be a quasi-religious exercise where the high priests of HTML5 must be consulted for their interpretation of the holy texts (the HTML5 spec). Don't waste hours trawling through confusing, poorly researched, and often flat-out wrong information on the

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jack Nutting has been using Cocoa since the olden days, long before it was even called Cocoa. He has used Cocoa and its predecessors to develop software for a wide range of industries and applications, including gaming, graphic design, online digital distribution, telecommunications, finance, publishing, and travel. When he is not working on Mac or iOS projects, he is developing web applications with Ruby on Rails. Nutting is a passionate proponent of Objective-C and the Cocoa frameworks. At the drop of a hat, he will speak at length on the virtues of dynamic dispatch and run time class manipulations to anyone who will listen (and even to some who won t). Nutting is the primary author of Learn Cocoa on the Mac (Apress, 2010) and Beginning iPad Development for iPhone Developers (Apress, 2010). He blogs from time to time at Nuthole.com.

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