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Minding Minors Wandering the Web : Regulating Online Child Safety

By: van der Hof, Simone.
Contributor(s): van den Berg, Bibi | Schermer, Bart.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Information Technology and Law Series: Publisher: Dordrecht : Springer, 2014Description: 1 online resource (304 p.).ISBN: 9789462650053.Subject(s): Computers and children | Internet -- Safety measures | Internet and children | Internet in educationGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Minding Minors Wandering the Web: Regulating Online Child SafetyDDC classification: 004.678083 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Contributors; Abbreviations; 1 Regulating Online Child Safety: Introduction; 1.1…Introduction; 1.2…An Overview of This Book; 1.3…Challenging Perspectives; Part IThe Regulatory Horizon; 2 Children's Rights Online: Challenges, Dilemmas and Emerging Directions; 2.1…Positioning Children's Rights Within Debates over Internet Governance; 2.2…Applying the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child to the Internet; 2.3…Protection Rights; 2.4…Provision Rights; 2.5…Participation Rights; 2.6…Unanswered Questions Regarding Children's Rights Online; 2.7…Persistent Policy Challenges
2.8…Can Children's Rights Online Be Left to Parents?2.9…Conclusion: Children's Rights and Responsibilities in a Digital Age; References; 3 A Framework for Responding to Online Safety Risks; 3.1…Introduction; 3.2…Possible Responses to Technological Risk; 3.2.1 Risk Response Continuum; 3.2.2 Generic Framework for Determining Optimal Strategy; 3.3…The Problem with Prohibition and Anticipatory Regulation; 3.3.1 Prohibition and Regulation Often Based on Irrational Technopanics; 3.3.2 Prohibition and Regulation-Based Strategies Can Threaten Free Speech and Expression
3.3.3 Prohibition and Regulation Can Constrain Progress3.3.4 Enforcement Challenges Constrain Prohibition and Regulatory-Based Strategies; 3.4…Why Resiliency and Adaptation Make More Sense for Online Safety Risks; 3.4.1 Education, Media Literacy, and Digital Citizenship; 3.4.2 User Empowerment, Self-regulation, and Best Practices; 3.4.3 Hybrid Approaches; 3.5…Conclusion; References; 4 Colouring Inside the Lines: Using Technology to Regulate Children's Behaviour Online; 4.1…Introduction; 4.2…Understanding Technological Influencing; 4.2.1 Persuasive Technologies and Nudging
4.2.2 Techno-Regulation4.3…Implementations of Techno-Regulation in Online Safety for Children; 4.3.1 Parental Control and Filtering Content; 4.3.2 Browsers for Kids; 4.3.3 Using Ports and Zoning; 4.4…Evaluating the Use of Technological Tools for Online Child Safety; 4.4.1 Effective Does Not Mean Absolutely Safe; 4.4.2 A Need to Run Risks?; References; Part IIEncountering Risk Versus Engaging in Risky Behaviour; 5 Safety by Literacy? Rethinking the Role of Digital Skills in Improving Online Safety; 5.1…Digital Skills and Online Safety: An Indistinct Relationship; 5.2…Mastering Skills
5.2.1 Instrumental Skills5.2.2 Structural/Informational Skills; 5.2.3 Strategic Skills; 5.2.4 Social Skills; 5.2.5 Creative and Production Skills; 5.3…More Skills, Higher Risks; 5.4…Policy Implications for Children's Digital Safety; 5.4.1 Young People's Own Responsibility; 5.4.2 Mediation by Parents; 5.4.3 Support from Schools; 5.4.4 Co-regulation by Government and Industry; 5.4.5 Conclusion and Discussion; References; 6 Taking Risks on the World Wide Web: The Impact of Families and Societies on Adolescents' Risky Online Behavior; 6.1…Introduction; 6.2…Children and Risky Online Behavior
6.3…Family Background and Risky Online Behavior
Summary: Ensuring online safety has become a topic on the regulatory agenda in many Western societies. However, regulating for online safety is far from easy, due to the wide variety of national and international, private and public actors and stakeholders that are involved. When regulating online risks for children it is important to strike the right balance between protection against harms on the one hand and safeguarding their fundamental freedoms and rights on the other. The authors in this book attempt to grapple with precisely this theme: striking the right balance between ensuring safety for chi
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ784 .I58 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1698419 Available EBL1698419

Contents; Contributors; Abbreviations; 1 Regulating Online Child Safety: Introduction; 1.1…Introduction; 1.2…An Overview of This Book; 1.3…Challenging Perspectives; Part IThe Regulatory Horizon; 2 Children's Rights Online: Challenges, Dilemmas and Emerging Directions; 2.1…Positioning Children's Rights Within Debates over Internet Governance; 2.2…Applying the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child to the Internet; 2.3…Protection Rights; 2.4…Provision Rights; 2.5…Participation Rights; 2.6…Unanswered Questions Regarding Children's Rights Online; 2.7…Persistent Policy Challenges

2.8…Can Children's Rights Online Be Left to Parents?2.9…Conclusion: Children's Rights and Responsibilities in a Digital Age; References; 3 A Framework for Responding to Online Safety Risks; 3.1…Introduction; 3.2…Possible Responses to Technological Risk; 3.2.1 Risk Response Continuum; 3.2.2 Generic Framework for Determining Optimal Strategy; 3.3…The Problem with Prohibition and Anticipatory Regulation; 3.3.1 Prohibition and Regulation Often Based on Irrational Technopanics; 3.3.2 Prohibition and Regulation-Based Strategies Can Threaten Free Speech and Expression

3.3.3 Prohibition and Regulation Can Constrain Progress3.3.4 Enforcement Challenges Constrain Prohibition and Regulatory-Based Strategies; 3.4…Why Resiliency and Adaptation Make More Sense for Online Safety Risks; 3.4.1 Education, Media Literacy, and Digital Citizenship; 3.4.2 User Empowerment, Self-regulation, and Best Practices; 3.4.3 Hybrid Approaches; 3.5…Conclusion; References; 4 Colouring Inside the Lines: Using Technology to Regulate Children's Behaviour Online; 4.1…Introduction; 4.2…Understanding Technological Influencing; 4.2.1 Persuasive Technologies and Nudging

4.2.2 Techno-Regulation4.3…Implementations of Techno-Regulation in Online Safety for Children; 4.3.1 Parental Control and Filtering Content; 4.3.2 Browsers for Kids; 4.3.3 Using Ports and Zoning; 4.4…Evaluating the Use of Technological Tools for Online Child Safety; 4.4.1 Effective Does Not Mean Absolutely Safe; 4.4.2 A Need to Run Risks?; References; Part IIEncountering Risk Versus Engaging in Risky Behaviour; 5 Safety by Literacy? Rethinking the Role of Digital Skills in Improving Online Safety; 5.1…Digital Skills and Online Safety: An Indistinct Relationship; 5.2…Mastering Skills

5.2.1 Instrumental Skills5.2.2 Structural/Informational Skills; 5.2.3 Strategic Skills; 5.2.4 Social Skills; 5.2.5 Creative and Production Skills; 5.3…More Skills, Higher Risks; 5.4…Policy Implications for Children's Digital Safety; 5.4.1 Young People's Own Responsibility; 5.4.2 Mediation by Parents; 5.4.3 Support from Schools; 5.4.4 Co-regulation by Government and Industry; 5.4.5 Conclusion and Discussion; References; 6 Taking Risks on the World Wide Web: The Impact of Families and Societies on Adolescents' Risky Online Behavior; 6.1…Introduction; 6.2…Children and Risky Online Behavior

6.3…Family Background and Risky Online Behavior

Ensuring online safety has become a topic on the regulatory agenda in many Western societies. However, regulating for online safety is far from easy, due to the wide variety of national and international, private and public actors and stakeholders that are involved. When regulating online risks for children it is important to strike the right balance between protection against harms on the one hand and safeguarding their fundamental freedoms and rights on the other. The authors in this book attempt to grapple with precisely this theme: striking the right balance between ensuring safety for chi

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Simone van der Hof is Full Professor of Law and Information Society at the Center for Law and the Information Society at Leiden University, the Netherlands. Bibi van den Berg is Assistant Professor at the Center for Law in the Information Society of Leiden University. Bart Schermer is Assistant Professor at the Center for Law in the Information Society of Leiden University.</p>

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