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Celebrating the Lives of Jewish Women : Patterns in a Feminist Sampler

By: Siegel, Rachel J.
Contributor(s): Cole, Ellen | Rothblum, Esther D.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2014Description: 1 online resource (364 p.).ISBN: 9781317791362.Subject(s): Feminism -- Religious aspects -- Judaism | Jewish women -- Canada -- Biography | Jewish women -- United States -- BiographyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Celebrating the Lives of Jewish Women : Patterns in a Feminist SamplerDDC classification: 305.48/6/96 | 305.48696 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Cover; Celebrating the Lives of Jewish Women; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; Editors; About the Authors; Foreword; Preface; Section I: From Generation to Generation: The Meanings of Mishpacha; Chapter 1. Living in a Glass Bowl: Tales of a Rabbi''s Daughter; Chapter 2. Bris, Britah: Parents'' First Lessons in Balancing Gender, Culture, Tradition, and Religion; Chapter 3. Married - Without a Chupa; Chapter 4. Queer Jewish Women Creating Families: New Perspectives on Jewish Family Values; Chapter 5. Mothers, Judaism, and True Honor; Chapter 6. Backwards and Forwards in America
Chapter 7. Personal Reflections on Being a Grandmother: L''Chol Dor Va DorSection II: Wandering Jews: Lives Fractured by Geography; Chapter 8. Jewish Identity Lost ... and Found; Chapter 9. Trials and Tribulations in the First Year of a "Mixed Sephardi/Ashkenazi Marriage"; Chapter 10. The Joys of Mitsvoth; Chapter 11. In Search of Eden; Chapter 12. Family Memories and Grave Anxieties; Section III: The Journey Home; Chapter 13. Really Jewish; Chapter 14. You Don''t Know Me Because You Can Label Me: Self-Identity of an Orthodox Feminist
Chapter 15. The Journey Home: Becoming a Reconstructionist RabbiChapter 16. Becoming Jewish; Chapter 17. How Jewish Am I?; Chapter 18. The Politics of Coming Home: Gender and Jewish Identities in the 1990s; Chapter 19. "Why Kafka?" A Jewish Lesbian Feminist Asks Herself; Section IV: Eve and the Tree of Knowledge: Woman''s Place Among the People of the Book ; Chapter 20. "I Don''t Know Enough": Jewish Women''s Learned Ignorance; Chapter 21. Learning to Leyn; Chapter 22. Better Late Than Early: A Forty-Eight-Year-Old''s Bat Mitzvah Saga
Chapter 23. Exploring Adolescent Jewish Female Identity: Reflections About Voice and RelationChapter 24. First There Are the Questions; Section V: Pain and Healing, Sorrow and Hope; Chapter 25. Jewish Battered Women: Shalom Bayit or a Shonde?; Chapter 26. Canadian Jewish Women and Their Experiences of Antisemitism and Sexism; Chapter 27. We Are Not As We Were: Jewish Women After the Holocaust; Chapter 28. Violent Legacies-Dialogues and Possibilities; Glossary; Index
Summary: Jewish women of all ages and backgrounds come together in Celebrating the Lives of Jewish Women to explore and rejoice in what they have in common--their heritage. They reveal in striking personal stories how their Jewishness has shaped their identities and informed their experiences in innumerable, meaningful ways. Survivors, witnesses, defenders, innovators, and healers, these women question, celebrate, and transmit Jewish and feminist values in hopes that they might bridge the differences among Jewish women. They invite both Jewish and non-Jewish readers to share in their discussions and stories that convey and celebrate the multiplicity of Jewish backgrounds, attitudes, and issues.In Celebrating the Lives of Jewish Women, you will read about cultural, religious, and gender choices, conversion to Judaism, family patterns, Jewish immigrant experiences, the complexities of Jewish secular identities, antisemitism, sexism, and domestic violence in the Jewish community. As the pages unfold in this wonderful book of personal odysseys, the colorful patterns of Jewish women's lives are laid before you. You will find much cause for rejoicing, as the authors weave together their compelling and unique stories about: midlife Bat mitzvah preparations the transmission of Jewish values by Sephardi and Ashkenazi grandmothers traditional Sephardi customs the sorrow and healing involved in coping with the Holocaust a lesbian's fascination with Kafka the external and internal obstacles Jewish women encounter in their efforts to study Jewish topics and participate in Jewish ritual becoming a Reconstructionist rabbi the difficulties and benefits of being the teenaged daughter of a rabbiA harmonious chorus of individual voices, Celebrating the Lives of Jewish Women will delight and inspire Jewish and non-Jewish readers alike. It reminds each of us how diverse and distinctive Jewish women's lives are, as well as how united they can be under the wonderful fold of Judaism. This book will be of great interest to all women, as well as to rabbis, Jewish community leaders and professionals, mental health workers, and those in Jewish studies, women's studies, and multicultural studies.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS115.2 .C45 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1702178 Available EBL1702178

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Celebrating the Lives of Jewish Women; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; Editors; About the Authors; Foreword; Preface; Section I: From Generation to Generation: The Meanings of Mishpacha; Chapter 1. Living in a Glass Bowl: Tales of a Rabbi''s Daughter; Chapter 2. Bris, Britah: Parents'' First Lessons in Balancing Gender, Culture, Tradition, and Religion; Chapter 3. Married - Without a Chupa; Chapter 4. Queer Jewish Women Creating Families: New Perspectives on Jewish Family Values; Chapter 5. Mothers, Judaism, and True Honor; Chapter 6. Backwards and Forwards in America

Chapter 7. Personal Reflections on Being a Grandmother: L''Chol Dor Va DorSection II: Wandering Jews: Lives Fractured by Geography; Chapter 8. Jewish Identity Lost ... and Found; Chapter 9. Trials and Tribulations in the First Year of a "Mixed Sephardi/Ashkenazi Marriage"; Chapter 10. The Joys of Mitsvoth; Chapter 11. In Search of Eden; Chapter 12. Family Memories and Grave Anxieties; Section III: The Journey Home; Chapter 13. Really Jewish; Chapter 14. You Don''t Know Me Because You Can Label Me: Self-Identity of an Orthodox Feminist

Chapter 15. The Journey Home: Becoming a Reconstructionist RabbiChapter 16. Becoming Jewish; Chapter 17. How Jewish Am I?; Chapter 18. The Politics of Coming Home: Gender and Jewish Identities in the 1990s; Chapter 19. "Why Kafka?" A Jewish Lesbian Feminist Asks Herself; Section IV: Eve and the Tree of Knowledge: Woman''s Place Among the People of the Book ; Chapter 20. "I Don''t Know Enough": Jewish Women''s Learned Ignorance; Chapter 21. Learning to Leyn; Chapter 22. Better Late Than Early: A Forty-Eight-Year-Old''s Bat Mitzvah Saga

Chapter 23. Exploring Adolescent Jewish Female Identity: Reflections About Voice and RelationChapter 24. First There Are the Questions; Section V: Pain and Healing, Sorrow and Hope; Chapter 25. Jewish Battered Women: Shalom Bayit or a Shonde?; Chapter 26. Canadian Jewish Women and Their Experiences of Antisemitism and Sexism; Chapter 27. We Are Not As We Were: Jewish Women After the Holocaust; Chapter 28. Violent Legacies-Dialogues and Possibilities; Glossary; Index

Jewish women of all ages and backgrounds come together in Celebrating the Lives of Jewish Women to explore and rejoice in what they have in common--their heritage. They reveal in striking personal stories how their Jewishness has shaped their identities and informed their experiences in innumerable, meaningful ways. Survivors, witnesses, defenders, innovators, and healers, these women question, celebrate, and transmit Jewish and feminist values in hopes that they might bridge the differences among Jewish women. They invite both Jewish and non-Jewish readers to share in their discussions and stories that convey and celebrate the multiplicity of Jewish backgrounds, attitudes, and issues.In Celebrating the Lives of Jewish Women, you will read about cultural, religious, and gender choices, conversion to Judaism, family patterns, Jewish immigrant experiences, the complexities of Jewish secular identities, antisemitism, sexism, and domestic violence in the Jewish community. As the pages unfold in this wonderful book of personal odysseys, the colorful patterns of Jewish women's lives are laid before you. You will find much cause for rejoicing, as the authors weave together their compelling and unique stories about: midlife Bat mitzvah preparations the transmission of Jewish values by Sephardi and Ashkenazi grandmothers traditional Sephardi customs the sorrow and healing involved in coping with the Holocaust a lesbian's fascination with Kafka the external and internal obstacles Jewish women encounter in their efforts to study Jewish topics and participate in Jewish ritual becoming a Reconstructionist rabbi the difficulties and benefits of being the teenaged daughter of a rabbiA harmonious chorus of individual voices, Celebrating the Lives of Jewish Women will delight and inspire Jewish and non-Jewish readers alike. It reminds each of us how diverse and distinctive Jewish women's lives are, as well as how united they can be under the wonderful fold of Judaism. This book will be of great interest to all women, as well as to rabbis, Jewish community leaders and professionals, mental health workers, and those in Jewish studies, women's studies, and multicultural studies.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

"This book is a sampler, and within its pages Jewish American and Canadian women have contributed pieces of writing that, like pieces of embroidery, illustrate their lives," assert editors Siegel and Cole (Jewish Women in Therapy: Seen But Not Heard, Haworth, 1991) of this collection of personal essays. Contributors include a wide-ranging group of Jewish women‘young and old; conservatives and liberals; converts; lesbians and heterosexuals‘and all attempt to "break the silence" traditionally expected of Jewish women. While embroidered samplers may include an assortment of stitches, there is usually a cohesiveness of style that lends a sense of unity to the piece. Unfortunately, the tone of these essays is so uneven‘from academic-with-footnotes to casual memoir‘that the collection lacks an overall unity and will be hard to recommend to specific groups of readers.‘Marcia G. Welsh, Guilford Free Lib., Ct. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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