Normal view MARC view ISBD view

From the Farm to the Table : What All Americans Need to Know about Agriculture.

By: Holthaus, Gary.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Culture of the land: Publisher: Lexington : The University Press of Kentucky, 2014Description: 1 online resource (392 p.).ISBN: 9780813146652 (electronic bk.); 0813146658 (electronic bk.); 9780813146669 (electronic bk.); 0813146666 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Agriculture -- United States | Farmers -- United States -- Anecdotes | Sustainable agricultureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: From the Farm to the Table : What All Americans Need to Know about AgricultureDDC classification: 630.973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; PART I. IN THE BEGINNING; Chapter 1. Fundamentals; Chapter 2. Histories; PART II. FARMERS TALKING ABOUT FARMING; Chapter 3. Two Views, One Farm: Vance and Bonnie Haugen; Chapter 4. Farming Is a Spiritual Responsibility: Mike Rupprecht; Chapter 5. Timelines: Ron Scherbring; Chapter 6. The Absolute Last Thing I Ever Dreamed I'd Be Doing: Lonny and Sandy Dietz; Chapter 7. I Felt It Was Just the Right Thing to Do: Dennis Rabe; PART III. FARMING IN AMERICA: WHO CARES?; Chapter 8. They Say Eating Is a Moral Issue: Bill McMillin
Chapter 9. Farming Connects Us AllPhoto gallery; PART IV. IT ALL WORKS TOGETHER, OR IT DOESN'T WORK AT ALL; Chapter 10. Agriculture and Community Culture; Chapter 11. Farming in Developing Countries; Chapter 12. The WTO, NAFTA, CAFTA, and the FTAA; PART V. ALTERNATIVE VISIONS, HOPEFUL FUTURES; Chapter 13. Healthy Food, Healthy Economics; Chapter 14. Alternatives for Agriculture and the Whole Culture; PART VI. AN ECOLOGY OF HOPE; Chapter 15. Ours for a Short Time: Peggy Thomas; Chapter 16. An Ecology of Hope; Notes; Sources and Resources; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P
Qr; s; t; u; v; w; y; z
Summary: In From the Farm to the Table, over forty farm families from America's heartland detail the practices and values that relate to their land, work, and communities. Their stories reveal that those who make their living in agriculture--despite stereotypes of provincialism perpetuated by the media--are savvy to the influence of world politics on local issues. Gary Holthaus demonstrates how outside economic, governmental, legal, and business developments play an increasingly influential, if not controlling, role in every farmer's life. The swift approval of genetically modified crops by the fede.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
S441 .H65 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt5vkk2r Available ocn870587645

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; PART I. IN THE BEGINNING; Chapter 1. Fundamentals; Chapter 2. Histories; PART II. FARMERS TALKING ABOUT FARMING; Chapter 3. Two Views, One Farm: Vance and Bonnie Haugen; Chapter 4. Farming Is a Spiritual Responsibility: Mike Rupprecht; Chapter 5. Timelines: Ron Scherbring; Chapter 6. The Absolute Last Thing I Ever Dreamed I'd Be Doing: Lonny and Sandy Dietz; Chapter 7. I Felt It Was Just the Right Thing to Do: Dennis Rabe; PART III. FARMING IN AMERICA: WHO CARES?; Chapter 8. They Say Eating Is a Moral Issue: Bill McMillin

Chapter 9. Farming Connects Us AllPhoto gallery; PART IV. IT ALL WORKS TOGETHER, OR IT DOESN'T WORK AT ALL; Chapter 10. Agriculture and Community Culture; Chapter 11. Farming in Developing Countries; Chapter 12. The WTO, NAFTA, CAFTA, and the FTAA; PART V. ALTERNATIVE VISIONS, HOPEFUL FUTURES; Chapter 13. Healthy Food, Healthy Economics; Chapter 14. Alternatives for Agriculture and the Whole Culture; PART VI. AN ECOLOGY OF HOPE; Chapter 15. Ours for a Short Time: Peggy Thomas; Chapter 16. An Ecology of Hope; Notes; Sources and Resources; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P

Qr; s; t; u; v; w; y; z

In From the Farm to the Table, over forty farm families from America's heartland detail the practices and values that relate to their land, work, and communities. Their stories reveal that those who make their living in agriculture--despite stereotypes of provincialism perpetuated by the media--are savvy to the influence of world politics on local issues. Gary Holthaus demonstrates how outside economic, governmental, legal, and business developments play an increasingly influential, if not controlling, role in every farmer's life. The swift approval of genetically modified crops by the fede.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Writer, editor, and poet Holthaus (Wide Skies: Finding a Home in the West), whose published works focus on questions of humankind's place in the landscape, turns his attention to sustainable agriculture in this exploration of the challenges and opportunities of developing an agriculture that will provide food for generations to come. Sponsored by the Minnesota-based Experiment in Rural Cooperation, Holthaus's book tells the story of modern agriculture through engaging interviews with men and women who make a living farming in southeastern Minnesota. In a tone reminiscent of Wendell Berry's A Place on Earth, he examines the far-reaching effects of genetically modified organisms, free-trade agreements that nurture "transnational corporate profit," dependence on fossil fuel-derived chemicals, and the toll all this has taken on the land and farmers. This heavily footnoted volume, one of the first in the new "Culture of the Land" series, will assist those engaged in agricultural policy research. Recommended for academic agriculture collections.-Sara Rutter, Univ. of Hawaii at Manoa Lib., Honolulu (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

With much love, dedication, and diligence, and through interviews with farmers in Minnesota, Holthaus (independent scholar) tells the story of today's agriculture--it is not a pretty picture. Echoing the sentiments of Lucretius, Thoreau, and Wendell Berry, he portrays modern farming as a dying occupation that has disrupted people's historic and cultural relationship with nature. The antipathy expressed toward large profit-oriented corporations, modern technology as taught by agricultural experiment stations, and confusing governmental leadership (with complex farm bills and a hostile World Trade Organization as examples) does not sit too well with the current technocratic leaders calling most of the shots. The movement toward agricultural sustainability, organic farming, small-style enterprises, environmentally friendly practices, and green thinking may or may not continue and grow. The book is indeed comprehensive in that it depicts both agricultural paradigms fairly well. But it is only the idealists who will embrace the author's utopian vision of a pristine, humane, nature-controlled agriculture, the way it has always been conducted and still is practiced by the Amish in Pennsylvania's Lancaster County. The rest keep blindly forging ahead with their destructive behavior. This book serves as an eye-opener. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels. M. Kroger emeritus, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Campus

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Gary Holthaus is the author of several books, including Wide Skies: Finding a Home in the West, Circling Back, and Unexpected Manna.</p>

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.